Blog
Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17   Entries 16-20 of 81
September 17, 2017, 8:11 PM

Unfair! Extravagant Forgiveness

by Sandy Bach

21 Then Peter came and said to him, “Lord, if another member of the church[a] sins against me, how often should I forgive? As many as seven times?” 22 Jesus said to him, “Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven[b] times 23 “For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. 24 When he began the reckoning, one who owed him ten thousand talents[c] was brought to him; 25 and, as he could not pay, his lord ordered him to be sold, together with his wife and children and all his possessions, and payment to be made. 26 So the slave fell on his knees before him, saying, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ 27 And out of pity for him, the lord of that slave released him and forgave him the debt. 28 But that same slave, as he went out, came upon one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii;[d] and seizing him by the throat, he said, ‘Pay what you owe.’ 29 Then his fellow slave fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.’ 30 But he refused; then he went and threw him into prison until he would pay the debt. 31 When his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their lord all that had taken place. 32 Then his lord summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked slave! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. 33 Should you not have had mercy on your fellow slave, as I had mercy on you?’ 34 And in anger his lord handed him over to be tortured until he would pay his entire debt. 35 So my heavenly Father will also do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother or sister[e] from your heart.” (Matthew 18:21-35 NRSV)

Note:  This is part two of a three-part series entitled, “Unfair!”  We will look at some texts that may make us feel uncomfortable, even angry and want to say to God, “That’s not fair!”

"Fool me once, shame on you.  Fool me twice, shame on me."

These are not words Jesus lived by.

You see, the particular congregation is unique.  Last week we pointed out that church isn't meant to be a civic group, nor a business entity, nor a not-for-profit organization.  Though a church holds a few aspects of each of these, it still stands out as uniquely different.  It's a place where members can let down their guard and be themselves.  They work together, pray together, break bread together.  They build trust within the group and then go out to share with the world.

At least, that's the way it's meant to be.  Being human, we often sin and an authentic church will point it out and help restore that person.  But what if they continue sinning?

That's a good question, and Peter isn't afraid to bring it up with Jesus.  In fact, he knows Jesus to be a generous man, so tries to second-guess him.  "How often should I forgive?  How about seven times?  That's a good number.  A heavenly number."

"Peter, I want you to quit counting.  That's what legalistic religious folk do.  They count up their mint and dill to make sure they tithe a perfect amount.  They use the law to get around behaving compassionately with people.  No, Peter.  I want you to forgive over and over and over again."

He sees the disappointment and horror on Peter's face.  Peter and the disciples clearly need a parable.

The lord of the manner is extravagant in many ways.  He's extravagant in his lending to the slave.  ten thousand talents is like saying "a bazillion million."  It's a ridiculous amount, unpayable by anyone.  The lord is also extravagant in his punishment.  In Jewish tradition, debtors prison was against the law.  In Greek and Roman law, it was permitted but rarely used.

The slave repents and begs for mercy.  How often do we repent and beg for mercy when we've hurt someone?  How often has someone repented with you when they've obviously hurt you?  Perhaps the slave had no other choice, but he found himself on his knees and asked for time to make it up.

Once again, the lord is extravagant.  He forgives the entire debt!  That's unheard of!  Out of great love and mercy, he graciously sets aside the debt.  The slave is free to go, his family safe from prison.  He can begin his life anew, debt free!

Here's the part we don't like.  The slave refuses to forgive the debt of a fellow slave.  The debt was high, about 100 days wages.  The forgiven slave had received lavish grace and forgiveness, and instantly forgot.  So, he gives his fellow slave what's coming to him--debtor's prison.

Don't like him much, do you?  Yet, isn't he us?  Seeing the personification of sin instead of children of God?  Afraid to show weakness and vulnerability?  We want the sinner to earn our forgiveness, to measure up.  Forgiving repeatedly is reckless irresponsible.

Yet, God forgives us multiple times.  Sometimes in one day!  Perhaps we should pay it forward.

Jesus taught us last week that we first confront the sinner and do everything possible to restore her to the congregation.  But, she has to be willing.  If not, she dishonors herself and the church.

But, we have to forgive for another reason.  Ourselves.  If we hang onto the wound, it damages us.  The behavior isn't forgiven and forgotten.  We have to let go so that we can remain authentic followers of Jesus.  We don't put people on probation.  At the same time, we don't deny our own hurt, nor do we minimize it.  It may take some time to move through this process.  We can do no less than what the lord of the manner did for the slave who owed a bazillion million.

I was falsely accused of something when I was in high school.  My accuser was one of the ministers, a person a highly regarded.  The church went to bat for me.  And I was counseled and allowed to feel the pain.  And, somewhere deep inside I refused to allow it to ruin church for me.  When the truth finally came out and I was exonerated, I had already forgiven.

Since that time, I understand all to well how church members can hurt and wound each other.  Furthermore, how church members surround the sinner and the wounded to bring life back.

What about the sinner?  What about that torture that's promised?

After King David took Uriah's wife, Bathsheba, and impregnated her.  He tried to cover it up and ultimately had Uriah murdered.  When Nathan the prophet approached David, he laid it out fully and completely.  David responded, "I have sinned against the Lord." (2 Samuel 12:13)  And in those words we feel David's mounting shame.  Psalm 51 is the result, when David cries out to God to, "purge me with hyssop...) (Ps 51:7a)

Ever been caught for doing something you shouldn't have done?  Wasn't the torture awful?  It blinds us as we almost double over in pain.  The shock is too much.  The only way through it is to face it.

This isn't easy stuff.  Lavish forgiveness from God, demands that we lavishly forgive the one sitting in the pew across from us.  Extravagance from God makes us want to be extravagant, as well.

I think that we do this more often than we give ourselves credit for.  We know our neighbor in the pew beside us.  We understand him, perhaps more than others do.  Because of that we make allowances and excuse some poor behavior.  After all, he's part of the "family."  We don't forget, but we do let it go.  And, a healthy relationship demands that we counsel him if he continues to misbehave.

Yet, sometimes we hurt more deeply than we realize.

Will  you allow one person (or even many) to ruin your relationship with God?  Or will you forgive and move on and allow your valuable friends to care for you?  Will you acknowledge the pain and move through it?

Will your use that painful memory to help others?  Will you help them acknowledge the sin and pain?  Will you help them refuse to let it ruin their lives?

Will you reflect Jesus' call to forgive over and over and over again?

 

It's unfair when we first look at it.  Unfair to forgive repeatedly.  But, when we behave like the forgiven servant and treat others poorly, it's unfair to them.

And, it's unfair to ourselves.

It dishonors Jesus and his Church.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

 




September 10, 2017, 12:00 AM

Unfair! Restoration for All

by Sandy Bach

15-17 “If a fellow believer hurts you, go and tell him—work it out between the two of you. If he listens, you’ve made a friend. If he won’t listen, take one or two others along so that the presence of witnesses will keep things honest, and try again. If he still won’t listen, tell the church. If he won’t listen to the church, you’ll have to start over from scratch, confront him with the need for repentance, and offer again God’s forgiving love.

18-20 “Take this most seriously: A yes on earth is yes in heaven; a no on earth is no in heaven. What you say to one another is eternal. I mean this. When two of you get together on anything at all on earth and make a prayer of it, my Father in heaven goes into action. And when two or three of you are together because of me, you can be sure that I’ll be there.”  (Matthew 18:15-20 The Message Copyright © 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002 by Eugene H. Peterson )

Note:  This is part one of a three-part series entitled, "Unfair!"  We will look at some texts that may make us feel uncomfortable, even angry and want to say to God, "That's not fair!"

Church, whether outside the walls like this blog or within traditional church walls, is not a non-profit organization.  Church isn't a club that exists to do good stuff, though reaching out is a part of our mission.  We do not pay dues, we return to God a portion of all that God has provided.  If it were that simple it would be easier: we could "recruit" new members, have a theme song and send out dues notices.  We could "assign" tasks and elect officers to lead us.

Church is more than the sum of its parts.  Church is made up of broken people who know they are in need.  Church is worship of God who is far more awesome and far bigger than we can even imagine.  Church is reaching out to others in unique ways: giving of time, talents and money; being in relationship with those who are in need but can't find what they're looking for.

Church is fellowship: breaking bread together at the communion table and at the potluck dinners; praying for each other in sickness and tragedy and death and hurtful times; laughing and crying; trusting enough to be vulnerable with each other.  Church is a place we can go to catch a glimpse of God's kingdom.

So, it's no surprise that Jesus spends some time teaching us how to be church.  And here's the rub: sometimes we misbehave and we have to deal with it using kingdom values.  Jesus doesn't permit us to behave like the culture around us behaves.  No, we have to behave like disciples of the One who went to the cross.

That's sooo unfair!

For example.  Jesus tells us how to handle disagreements.  It's a step-by-step formula:

  1. Confront him or her privately.  Try to work out your differences and come to terms that are agreeable.
  2.  If that doesn't work, take one or two others to be witnesses and to keep things honest and fair.
  3. If that doesn't work, tell the church.
  4. If that doesn't work, treat her or him like a tax collector or a Gentile.

Step one may be difficult but it's definitely do-able.  Prayerfully, speaking in private can usually bring out the differences and reconciliation can be achieved.  It may feel awkward.  For some, it isn't easy.  I've had times in my life when I've chosen not to approach and it's turned worse instead of better.

Step two, gets a bit more difficult.  Finding two members of the congregation who can act impartially and prayerfully is critical to the success of this step.  Jesus specifically states that they are to act as witnesses, not body guards or henchmen.  No bullying allowed!  Talk it out and listen to your witnesses.

Step three.  Now it's getting harder.  Take it to the church.  Oh my.  I don't like to air dirty laundry in public.  Let's just drop it and I'll deal with it the best I can.  Nope, says Jesus. That's not allowed.  The church will need to provide a place of healing and reconciliation.  Everyone is vulnerable at this point and no one is allowed an "out."

Healing and reconciliation.  Hard words these days.  The news in my city has been difficult this week: murders, someone literally using their automobile to attack homeless victims.  Our societal nerves are worn so thin that our anger is a hair-trigger.  Social media is not just a place to share joys and concerns.  It's a place to display your anger and disgust in hate-filled ways.  We hate with ease; listen less and yell more; shut down when we don't like what we hear.

In the best of times, the church is the one place where healing happens because we listen prayerfully.  The congregation recognizes that Jesus is present and they know that everything they say and do is in his presence.

And after all that, if the offender refuses to repent, you can oust him or her.

Really?  Do you honestly believe that Jesus would permit that?  Scripture says we can treat him or her like a tax collector or a Gentile.  So, get those excommunication papers ready, and strip the offender of the keys to the church.  He's out of here!

Slow down.  Think about this.  Get your Bible out.

Who did Jesus associate with?  Tax collectors and Gentiles and sinners.  He enjoyed many a meal with them and offered relationship, healing and entry into fellowship.

Just prior to this text, we learn about a God who doesn't want to lose a single believer.  This God will leave 99 sheep behind to search for that  lone lost one.

Jesus also taught his disciples and followers that simple faith is the way into the kingdom.  No bullying allowed.

So, why did Jesus say, "Treat them like a tax collector and a Gentile"?  He said this to remind us that we have to start again from scratch.  We confront them with the need to repent and we offer God's forgiving love.

Unfair?  Perhaps.

But, there's more.

"What you bind on earth will be bound in heaven.  What you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven."  That doesn't mean that you have the power.  Nor does the church have the power.  Go to God in prayer with this.  Serious prayer and discernment and God will get to it.

Prayer is that place where we go to share with God what we think and feel, what gives us pain, what we question and don't understand.  Prayer is the place we go where God listens and God speaks.  God's got this.  God will work it out.

It seems unfair, doesn't it?

Being a member of Christ's church means that we have to work together and grow and strive with each other.  That striving means confronting, at times.  And when we do that we risk a lot and that's difficult.  We risk losing a friendship; we risk hurting someone.  But we also have an opportunity for growth and reconciliation that can't be achieved if we walk away and allow the hurt to simmer and grow.

Being a member of Christ's Church is serious business.  What we say or do is witnessed by Jesus.  He closes this passage with the reminder that wherever two or three are gathered, he's there with us.  So, if Jesus is present, what do you want him to witness: poor, unloving, hate-filled behavior?  Or an attempt at loving (even tough loving) filled with prayer and discernment?

It may seem unfair until we realize that we be the one in need of being reconciled.

It may feel unfair that you can't let a fellow believer loose and drop her from the rolls.  What if you're the one being set loose?

It may be unfair that we can't walk away from each other and forget.  We can walk away, but we can't forget.  We have to keep them in prayer just as we are held in prayer when we go astray.

When we honor this teaching from Jesus, we gain from it.  We are stronger, more faithful and less vulnerable.  We become a fellowship that builds bridges, tears down walls, and walks with each other in love.  Even tough love.

We become a place where no one is written off.  Not even you.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




August 27, 2017, 12:00 AM

Forgive and Forget?

by Sandy Bach

45 Then Joseph could no longer control himself before all those who stood by him, and he cried out, “Send everyone away from me.” So no one stayed with him when Joseph made himself known to his brothers. And he wept so loudly that the Egyptians heard it, and the household of Pharaoh heard it. Joseph said to his brothers, “I am Joseph. Is my father still alive?” But his brothers could not answer him, so dismayed were they at his presence.

Then Joseph said to his brothers, “Come closer to me.” And they came closer. He said, “I am your brother, Joseph, whom you sold into Egypt. And now do not be distressed, or angry with yourselves, because you sold me here; for God sent me before you to preserve life. For the famine has been in the land these two years; and there are five more years in which there will be neither plowing nor harvest. God sent me before you to preserve for you a remnant on earth, and to keep alive for you many survivors. So it was not you who sent me here, but God; he has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house and ruler over all the land of Egypt. Hurry and go up to my father and say to him, ‘Thus says your son Joseph, God has made me lord of all Egypt; come down to me, do not delay. 10 You shall settle in the land of Goshen, and you shall be near me, you and your children and your children’s children, as well as your flocks, your herds, and all that you have. 11 I will provide for you there—since there are five more years of famine to come—so that you and your household, and all that you have, will not come to poverty.’ 12 And now your eyes and the eyes of my brother Benjamin see that it is my own mouth that speaks to you. 13 You must tell my father how greatly I am honored in Egypt, and all that you have seen. Hurry and bring my father down here.” 14 Then he fell upon his brother Benjamin’s neck and wept, while Benjamin wept upon his neck. 15 And he kissed all his brothers and wept upon them; and after that his brothers talked with him. (Genesis 45:1-15 NRSV)

He was a spoiled, entitled "little brother." Worst of all, Dad loved him best.

He was bright, but he wasn't very savvy.  He was an immature seventeen-year-old when he shared with his brothers some of his dreams.

"It was an awesome dream.  We were all binding sheaves in the field when my sheaf stood tall and all your sheaves gathered around mine and bowed to it."  (Genesis 37:7)

"I had another dream," he announced a few days later.  "The sun and the moon and eleven stars were bowing down to me."

Everyone knew the meaning of these dreams.  Joseph believed that some day his brothers would bow down to him; that he would rule over them.  Outrageous!  His father rebuked him strongly. As far as his brothers were concerned, it was too little too late.

His brothers planned to kill him.  Through a series of incidents they ended up selling him to a band of Ishmaelites who were traveling to Egypt from Gilead, the producer of balm.  They made a deal with the caravan drivers and then reported back to their father that Joseph had been killed by a wild animal.

Joseph served in the house of Potiphar, the captain of the Egyptian guard.  Joseph rose in stature in the general's home and served him well.  Meanwhile, Mrs. Potiphar found Joseph to be handsome and tried to seduce him.  Joseph would have none of it, so she accused him of attempted rape.  Joseph was thrown in jail.

His fellow prisoners discovered his gift of interpreting dreams.  Pharaoh's cup bearer was one of these, having been put in jail under Pharaoh's orders.  Joseph accurately interpreted his dreams and assured him he would be returned to service.  When the cup bearer was, indeed, returned to service, he heard that Pharaoh had dreams of his own.  Eventually, he remembered Joseph and recommended him to Pharaoh.  And now we come to the heart of the Joseph "novella."

Joseph successfully interpreted Pharaoh's dream and also provided a solution to what would become a national disaster.  For seven years, the land would enjoy bumper crops of grain.  But, then there would be seven years of famine.  The solution Joseph suggested was ingenious and simple: find someone whom you trust and have him oversee the collection of the crops.  Every year, one-fifth of the harvest should be held in silos until the famine strikes.  Then there will be enough for everyone.

Pharaoh not only approved the plan, he appointed Joseph to oversee the project.  Joseph successfully saved Egypt from starvation and disaster.  He rose to power quickly, becoming Pharaoh's second in command.

Now the scene is set.  God has been at work.  Joseph's plight has been used to carry out God's plan to save Jacob's family in Canaan.  By the second year of famine, Canaan has also come up against hard times and Jacob sends his sons to Egypt to purchase grain.  Joseph recognizes them immediately; all they see is an Egyptian ruler.

Joseph toys with them and holds them for a few days.  Eventually, he concocts a plan to get them to go back for their youngest brother, Benjamin.  Joseph and Benjamin had been close as children, and he longed to see him.  He also knew that his father, Jacob, would be reluctant to let Benjamin go since he was his new favorite son.

Eventually, the time comes for Joseph to reveal himself.  And this is the twist in the story.  He could have had his brothers imprisoned, even killed.  He could have sold them into slavery like they had done to him.  He could have refused to sell them grain.  He had the power to act out his pain any way he desired.

He chose to forgive them.

Forgiveness isn't forgetting.  It isn't saying that it's okay.  Selling Joseph into slavery wasn't okay.  It was a horrible thing to do.  It hurt Joseph; it nearly killed their father.  They mistreated a beloved creation of God.

I believe it was Lily Tomlin who said, "Forgiveness means giving up all hope for a better past."  She's right.  When we hold onto the hurt, we're allowing the chains of pain to encircle us and choke us off.  We become bitter and hateful and hate-filled.  We fail to be the authentic person God intends us to be.

Forgiveness is a process.  When the shooter of nine people at Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC was brought before a judge, an amazing thing happened.  One by one, members of the church confronted him.  They described their pain and what he had done to change their lives and their families forever.  And to a person, each one said, "I forgive you."

They weren't saying, "Oh, it's okay.  You're in a bad place."  They also didn't say, "May you rot in hell!"  They didn't get through their pain that day.  What they said was, "You and evil will not win today."

That Sunday in worship, they sang, "This is my story, this is my song, praising my savior all the day long." Over and over and over again, they sang it.  They would not allow evil to rule the day.  They would not allow anger and hate to wrap them in its grip and change them.  They clearly understood themselves to be children of God and followers of Christ.  They would get through this with God's help.  And the first step was forgiving.

Joseph not only forgave, he began the steps to reconciliation.  Notice that he stated clearly what the brothers had done to him: selling him into slavery.  Joseph looked back on how his life had played out and saw God at work.  Because of his being sent to Egypt, Joseph was able to save his family and provide a place for them to grow and thrive.

The brothers and Joseph probably spent years reconciling what had been done and understanding how God had used it for good.  It would be years before the brothers would seek forgiveness from Joseph and he would give it.  "Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today."  (Genesis 50:20 NRSV)

What does forgiveness look like today?  It looks like an adult son of an abusive father finally facing and acknowledging the physical and emotional pain and saying, "I forgive him.  I don't know what pain he was suffering, but I refuse to let it ruin my life.  I forgive him."

It looks like an employee forgiving a boss stealing his ideas to make himself look good.  He moves on to use his newly recognized gifts with an employer who values his contributions.

It looks like a support group for parents of murdered children who acknowledge their pain and suffering and use it to help others in similar circumstances while working to strengthen laws that make their community safer.

It looks like a group of people who realize their white privilege.  They acknowledge it and forgive themselves.  Then they work with others to understand and eliminate racist laws and attitudes.  They refuse to hate.  They choose to stand with and for others who are hurt and sidelined.

That spoiled and entitled little brother has a lot to teach us about forgiveness.  He had to  learn who he was and how he had hurt others.  He lived out a value system that refused to take advantage of others, but chose to help others understand themselves.

He learned to use his gifts of discernment and organization to save his adopted nation and his birth family.

As I study white privilege I am appalled and ashamed.  I have lived a good life, having worked hard to get where I am today.  Yet, I now realize that there are many who worked harder than I did and didn't get as far, not because of anything to do with their failings, but because of the color of their skin.

We have a choice.  Ignore it and the growing hatred in our nation.  Understand it and live in shame.

Or.  We can learn and understand and forgive ourselves.  Then step forward with others to stem this tide of bigotry and hate, not to make ourselves feel better or to make atonement.  But, because we recognize injustice for what it is and that God created us to live in peace and harmony with our neighbor, regardless of race or ethnicity or disability or anything else that threatens to separate us.

I choose forgiveness.  I pray for discernment to move into a place of reconciliation with my neighbor.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




August 13, 2017, 12:00 AM

Lonely the Boat

by Sandy Bach

22 Immediately he made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. 23 And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, 24 but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land,[a] for the wind was against them. 25 And early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. 26 But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. 27 But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”28 Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” 29 He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. 30 But when he noticed the strong wind,[b] he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” 31 Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” 32 When they got into the boat, the wind ceased. 33 And those in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

Jesus is tired.  Physically and emotionally exhausted.  Spiritually depleted.  A trip home that should have been filled with joy ended in shambles as the townspeople utterly rejected him.  And then word arrived that his close friend, John the Baptizer was killed by Herod as a result of drunken party and young woman's erotic dance.

He went off for rest only to discover that crowds of people followed him.  5,000 plus women and children.  People energize Jesus.  And when he saw them, he couldn't not take care of them.  He healed.  He cured.  He fed.  He created community.  And as we stepped back from the scene, we caught a glimpse of God's kingdom: a place where everyone is accepted, agape love abounds and all are fed until they're full.

If Jesus was tired before this, he's thoroughly exhausted now.  He needs time to pray and grieve and rest.  It's time for the crowd to pack up and return home.  He and the disciples watch as they begin to gather their meager belongings.  Mothers gather their children.  Father's shake hands with new-found friends.  Jesus turns to the twelve.

"Get in the boat and head to the other side.  I'll join you later."

They try to argue with him.  Why don't you come with us?  A couple of us will stay with you.  How will you travel to join us?

"Just go.  I'll be okay."

He turns back to the crowd and provides a final blessing and benediction.  The crowd begins their journey while the twelve get in the boat.

Quiet settles slowly.  Peace and quiet.  Jesus can finally have that alone time he needs.  Slowly he walks the narrow path up the mountain where he can be closer to God.  The next several hours are spent in prayer, rest and sleep.  More prayer.  Perhaps some weeping.  So much evil in the world.  So much to do.  Not enough time to get it all done.

Prayer.  Rest. Sleep. Repeat.  God's shalom surrounds him.  Pray. Rest. Sleep.  The brokenness and hostility of the world drop away to be replaced with God's wholeness, completeness, fullness and balance.  Peace and shalom surrounds Jesus as he prays and rests and sleeps throughout the night.

Meanwhile, a storm is brewing.  Storms develop quickly on the Sea of Galilee.  The winds sweep down the mountains and toss the sea around like a bowl of water.  The fishermen on the boat call out orders to the novices.  (What do tax collectors and political zealots know about boats and angry seas?)

They hold on to the the ropes while wiping water from their eyes with their upper arms.  This storm is bad.  Can they survive it?  Fear has them in its grip.  Just when it couldn't get worse, it does.  A ghost appears, walking directly toward their wind-tossed boat.

Oh, great! a demon, perhaps?  We're surely doomed, now.

Then they hear his voice.  Calm, steady, piercing the sound of the wind.  "It's okay.  It's me.  Don't be afraid."

Peter drops his ropes and makes his way to that side of the boat.  "It's him!  He's walking toward us.  On the water!"

"Lord, order me to come out and join you.  Let me try it."

"Okay, Peter.  Come on out."  And he gestures with his arm.

Eagerly, but but not without a tiny bit of trepidation, Peter climbs over the side of the boat and lowers himself onto the water.  He did it.  He's standing on the water!  Now, he takes a step.  He gazes on Jesus and sees his encouraging smile.  Water sloshes around his toes as he takes steps toward the Master.

He'd forgotten all about the storm.  Suddenly, a gale slaps him across the face and he drops his attention from Jesus.  Fear and doubt settle in; he drops into the water like a rock.

"What was I thinking?  What a stupid thing to do.  I've let everyone down, especially Jesus.  Some disciple I am!

Just then he feels strong hands reach around him and lift him out of the water.  "You did good, Peter.  Why did you doubt?"

And then the peace.  That shalom that Jesus brings with him.  That wholeness; completeness; balance.  Peace settles the storm and the disciples fall to their knees.  Tired, worn; awe-filled and trembling.

Once again they realize what they've known all along.  "Truly, you are the Son of God."

It's a lovely narrative.  Lots of scenery and color and movement.  Peace and fear; miracle and failure; most of all, a happy ending.

What scares you?  Really scares you.  I'm talking about paralyzing fear that engulfs you like that storm on the Sea of Galilee.

How badly our churches want to enter into the mission field.  They want to reach out to help those who are holding on tight while poverty or illness engulfs them.  They want to make broken lives better; offer healing from abuse; reach out to the children so desperately in need of shalom.

But, we're paralyzed with fear.  We don't know where to begin.  We don't have enough people.  Money is at an all-time low.  Do we pay the electric bill or fund that new mission?

We try.  We step out and try and when we don't see the immediate return, we feel like failures.  We did something wrong.  God wasn't with us.  We're failures and the whole world has witnessed us making fools of ourselves.  We've let God down.

And we step back into the church and close the doors against the howling storms of a broken world.

Here's the good news:  it's not about us.

God calls us to be faithful, not successful.  That's God's job.

Several years ago I  met a minister from New England.  He pastored a church located in the worst part of the inner city.  He shared with me their ministry.

It was litany of one success after another.  They cleaned out the old basement and have a food pantry and offer classes to the neighborhood to help them get a job.  The members spent days going out into the neighborhood picking up trash (including spent needles and condoms.)  For several minutes my new friend waxed eloquently about everything his congregation was doing to meet needs.  He was excited and grateful.

The more he talked, the quieter I became.  Finally, I asked him a question.  "How long have you been doing this?  How long did it take to figure out your call?"

He paused for a thoughtful moment and studied my face.  I think he saw my fear and disappointment at my own meager attempts.  It turns out that he knew what I was feeling.  He'd been in my shoes.

"It took years," he finally replied.  "It took years to get to the point in our ministry where we could see the next opportunity.  Not everything worked and not everything works today.  In fact, we had several starts in the beginning."

We talked a bit longer.  About false starts and lack of clear vision and disappointment.  His parting words to me were, "Keep moving forward.  Step out in faith.  Remember that Jesus only had twelve disciples and one of them was the devil!"

Stepping out is hard.  We want to.  We so desperately want to.  We hear that call to offer healing and food.  But, we're held back by scarcity.  We need more money and time and people.  We forget that Jesus is in charge and will provide all that we need.

What we need is a miracle.  The miracle of Jesus' calm voice saying, "Little Believers, you won't let me down.  Your tiny mustard seed faith is all I need from you.  Whatever happens, I'll never ever be disappointed in you.

"Little Believers, that boat is filled with fear and scarcity.  Step out in prayer.  And keep stepping out.  Sometimes you'll sink like a rock; other times you'll soar with the eagles.

"Little Believers, step out.  Don't worry about what others are thinking.  That's what takes your eyes off of me.  Don't worry about pleasing some high expectations you think I have.  That's the rain slashing across your face.

"Little Believers.  Step out.  I've got you and I'll provide what's missing: energy, time, people, money."

Do we dare do it?  Do we dare to step out of that lonely, fear-washed boat?  Someone needs you to offer them Jesus' healing and shalom.

Are you the one he's calling?

If so, listen to him say,

"Come on Little Believer.  Let's get to work.  That's it.  Step out of that boat.

"Yes!  I knew you could do it!"

After all.  Is anything impossible with God?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




July 30, 2017, 12:00 AM

Challenges and Opportunities

by Sandy Bach

I’m absolutely convinced that nothing—nothing living or dead, angelic or demonic, today or tomorrow, high or low, thinkable or unthinkable—absolutely nothing can get between us and God’s love because of the way that Jesus our Master has embraced us.  (Romans 8:26-39 The Message)

When my son was in middle school, his aunt bought him a hand held video game.  It was his pride and joy.  He took it everywhere with him and took very good care of it.  One night he woke me up in tears.  Somehow his precious video game had gotten damaged.  Through bleary eyes I could see that the display was utterly destroyed. He was beside himself and I could barely remain awake.  "There are always options, honey.  Go to bed and we'll work it out in the morning."  And I fell back to sleep.

The next morning he was up early, dressed and ready for breakfast.  He was never up early, was never dressed and ready for breakfast.  In fact mornings were a constant battle to get him moving out the door to school.  Then I remembered: the video game.  He was making sure I'd be ready to help him find a solution.

I was wrong.

He entered the kitchen with a piece of notebook paper on a clip board.  He had written notes on it that filled the page.

"Mom, do you know where Federal Express is located?"

"There's an office about a mile from here.  Why?"

"If we can pack up my video game and put this Return Merchandise Authority number on the package and ship it to this address, they'll repair it and return it to me."

I was stunned.  He had actually listened to me.  Did I mention he was in middle school?  He had heard me say repeatedly throughout his young life that there are usually options if you pause to consider them.  As it turned out, he found the toll-free number to call the support line and they give him the information he needed.  At 1:00 AM, no less!

Challenges and opportunities.  My young son had learned early in life that a broken video game wasn't the end of the world.  And I learned that my son could be resourceful.

Challenges and opportunities.  Where do you live?  In a world of challenges and burdens?  Or a world with opportunities and resources?

Jesus was clear about bad things in life:  "...for [God] makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous." (Mt. 6:45b)

Bad things happen to good people.  Life is filled with moments of joy and wonderment and miracles.  God's creation comes alive every spring and we're reminded of God's abundance; in the fall we see nature "shut down" and prepare for winter.  Mustard seeds sprout in unexpected places: friends showing up to help a seriously ill loved one; a teenager turning her life around; the miracle of birth.  Often what we take for granted are miracles all around us.

If good things happen, so do bad.  I overheard a conversation where someone said, "Why is this happening to me?"  The answer came back, "Why not?"  Was the response meant to be snarky, or was she pointing out to her friend that the rain falls on the evil and the good alike?  Being a Christian doesn't protect us from life.  Being a Christian gives us stamina to get through life and do it with grace.

What are your particular challenges?  Can you see opportunities in them?  A seed can't be protected.  It has to be buried and it has to die in order to produce a strong tree or beautiful flowers.  Broken video games can help a young teenager learn how to find solutions.  The political party you oppose offers opportunities to broaden your thinking on the issues.  That debilitating illness can provide you with a more compassionate spirit and challenge you to allow others to help you.

Do you concentrate on burdens or on resources?  When ministers and pastors and priests stand in the pulpit, they see their flock. These shepherds know the pain and joy of each member of the flock: the broken kids, the dying, those who worry about their job prospects, the ones tired of living.  They know deeply the pain and angst of their congregations and they hold them in prayer and in their arms.

Looking for resources and opportunities doesn't mean we look at life through rose-colored glasses.  No.  This type of thinking and praying means that we have to see the absolute worst in our situation.  Only then can we define what our needs are.  For healing, yes.  But, also for assistance from friends or advice from support groups.  Maybe it means a change in your life situation that can lead to something new and fulfilling.

Looking for resources and opportunities is how we see the abundance in our lives.  Instead of a scarcity of money, we find an abundance of help.  Rather than a scarcity of energy, we find deep rest.  Instead of a scarcity of time, we discover what "letting go and letting God" really means.

This year has lasted about 3 years!  My husband and I have experienced death of loved ones and setbacks in our health.  One day I was deep in prayer and felt God's presence in a new and different way.  That afternoon I shared this with my husband and said, "I don't know what the future brings, but I do know that God is waiting for us there and we'll be okay.  I'm ready to step into that future, no matter what it brings."

Our journey has included some difficult twists and turns.  I've learned so much and I've met some amazing people who have "been there and done that" and infused me with hope.  Our mailbox overflows with cards and well-wishes.  I'm a stronger, more compassionate person for our experience.  I don't know what the next big thing will be.  Living today is all I want and need.

We can't always avoid the challenges in life.  Sometimes we bring them on ourselves; sometimes they simply happen.  Paul knew all about this and wrote about persecution often.  But he believed with every fiber of his being that nothing, not anything can separate us from God's love. Read his words once again:

I’m absolutely convinced that nothing—nothing living or dead, angelic or demonic, today or tomorrow, high or low, thinkable or unthinkable—absolutely nothing can get between us and God’s love because of the way that Jesus our Master has embraced us.  (Romans 8:26-39 The Message)

Nothing can get in the way of you and God.  We can accept trouble with grace because God's got this.  Miracles will happen: not necessarily the way we want them, but keep an eagle eye out.  You'll see them.

We can accept trouble with grace.  We can look for miracles.  We can look at the opportunities and resources.

Because God's got our back.

And that's all we need.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17   Entries 16-20 of 81
Contents © 2018 The First Presbyterian Church of Cleveland | Church Website Provided by mychurchwebsite.net | Privacy Policy