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November 20, 2016, 9:14 AM

The Shepherd King

by Sandy Bach

5 The days are surely coming, says the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, and he shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. 6 In his days Judah will be saved and Israel will live in safety. And this is the name by which he will be called: “The Lord is our righteousness.”  (Jeremiah 23:5-6 NRSV)

This is the last day in our Christian Year. The year began, not with noise makers and parties, but quietly as we prepared our hearts and lives for the arrival of the Messiah: the first and the second coming.

The Messiah arrived amidst a flurry of activity and excitement.  For a few short but frenzied weeks, we looked forward, standing on tip-toe, waiting for him.  He finally arrived: a vulnerable baby, born in a stable, wrapped in rags, a feeding trough for a crib.  His visitors, lowly shepherds who were considered the bottom of the food chain.

And we call him King.

We know little of his early years, but we spent a considerable number of Sundays trying to learn from him so that we could follow him more nearly.  As we watched his ministry grow, we followed with enthusiasm, seeking his kingdom.  We watched the denial, the betrayal, the trial. We watched the crucifixion.

And we call him King.

He hung on a cross among thieves.  “Father forgive them…” he called out to God.  “They don’t know what they’re doing!”

And we call him King.

The crowd tried to shame him.  The Roman soldiers mocked him.  He assured one of those dying near him that, “today you will be with me in Paradise.”

And we call him King.

Three days later we tried to understand his resurrection.  They couldn’t keep him down, not even by killing him.  His was raised from grave, the victor over death.  He could have hung out with anyone: Caesar, Herod, Pilate, the Wise Men from afar.  He could have gone anywhere and done anything he wanted to do.  He chose to hang out with his disciples and followers.

And we call him King.

He spent time with this motley group of followers.  He taught, they listened and finally got it.  Then he ascended to be with God.

And we call him King.

He was the Good Shepherd, Messiah, Son of God, Son of Man, Emmanuel, Christ.

We called him King.

Paul wrote to the Colossians:

“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created, things visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or powers – all things have been created through him and for him.  He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together.  He is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that he might come to have first place in everything.  For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him God was pleased to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, by making peace through the blood of the cross.” (Colossians 1:15-20)

We call him King.

And then we go out and worry and fret and bicker and fight.

Yes, peace is still elusive; I’m not seeing the swords and spears industries dying.  Plows and pruning hooks are still at a premium.  Although, they are out there.

We have serious problems that need serious answers.  Four years ago some of you were ready to slit your wrists over the election results.  This year, others of you are considering it.

We’re scattered by the powers that be.  We’re out of control.  We look to ourselves for power and feel powerless.  We’ve lost ourselves in despair and hate.

Is it worse today than when God called Moses from the burning bush?  Than when David was anointed king? Then when Martin Luther hung his 93 Theses on the Chapel door? Then when Dietrich Bonhoeffer and his colleagues stood up against Hitler’s Nazi regime? Then during the demonstrations in Martin Luther King, Jr’s day?

Do we dare to read the paper or watch the news in an attitude of prayer?  Can we analyze what we see through the lens of Jesus as King?  Can we read in Jeremiah’s prophecy the words from God that say, “I will attend,” “I myself will gather,” I will bring them back,” “I will raise up shepherds”?  That God is always at work, even when we least realize it?

How does this speak to us today?  As we end this liturgical year, we need our king more than ever.  Read that Colossians text again.  It has so much depth.  You can’t read it quickly; you can’t even read it all at once.  Take one phrase at a time and ponder what this means to you.

God raised up a righteous branch for Israel and has provided for God’s Chosen People.  God sent the Messiah to earth to show us the way.  How do we live faithfully in the King’s Reign?  How do we live out what we believe when we stutter over the words, “Christ is King.  Christ reigns”?

Christ is King.  Christ reigns supreme.  And no one, no matter how powerful they think they are, can come close.

Christ is King.  He asks the impossible of us, like giving up all we have and giving to the poor; be willing to carry our own cross; to come and die to our old self; hate father and mother; drop our nets of career and identity and follow him.

This is the one we call King.

As we enter the Advent Season, I invite you to once again journey to the manger.  Look at the world through the Christ Lens.  Look for Christ and his activity in the world.

Allow the King to make a difference in your life.  Allow yourself to give up what you really don’t need.  Demand of scripture explanations for that which makes no sense.

Journey to the manger to meet your King again for the very first time.

We call him King.  His reign is radical and counter-cultural.

We call him King.

What he teaches doesn’t always make sense in this world.

We call him King.

He’s all we’ve got.

But, then again, he’s all we need.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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November 14, 2016, 12:00 AM

Church at Home

Focusing on the One to Come

by Sandy Bach

13 As he came out of the temple, one of his disciples said to him, “Look, Teacher, what large stones and what large buildings!” 2 Then Jesus asked him, “Do you see these great buildings? Not one stone will be left here upon another; all will be thrown down.” (Mark 13:1-2 NRSV)

 

Several years ago, my husband and I had an opportunity to tour England, Scotland and Wales.  The highlight of the trip was a tour of St. Michael's Cathedral in Coventry.  Their story is unique and inspiring.

Coventry was a industrial city: manufacturers of bicycles, automobiles, plane engines and munitions.  It was not unusual that it was a target of the Germans during WWII.  75 years ago on November 14, 1940 saw the worst of the bombing raids.  The Germans called it Operation Moonlight Sonata.  They first dropped marker flares.  Follow-up bombers dropped high explosive bombs directed at the city's infrastructure: water, electricity, telephones, gas and streets.  With bad roads and a low water supply, the fire brigades would be limited in their ability to put out fires.

Then the bombing began in earnest: waves and waves of a variety of bombs meant to hamper the city and damage roofs so that incendiary bombs could do their worst.  Around 8:00 that evening, Coventry Cathedral was hit for the first time.  They managed to put out the fire, but soon after a firestorm ensued and all attempts to save the structure utterly failed.

When the all clear sounded the followed morning, Coventry's citizens came out of shelter to find their city decimated.  Two-thirds of the city lay in ruins.  Some made their way to the Cathedral to discover that only one wall remained.  The balance of the cathedral lay in ruins.  During the following week a crew worked to clean out the ruins.  Some charred beams were found lying together in the shape of a cross.  The cathedral stonemason tied them together and mounted them on the ruins.

The Provost of the cathedral came across nails from the roof and formed three of them into a cross.  The Cross of Nails has become a symbol of peace and reconciliation in the world.  The most moving event took place in that same week, when the Provost had words written across the only wall to remain standing: "Father, Forgive."

When Jesus and his disciples left the temple in Jerusalem, they must have felt about the temple the way we feel when we enter the great cathedrals of Europe.  They are huge beyond our imagination.  They represent that God is bigger than all of us and we can feel God's power and presence.  The temple was described as a huge pile of marble with gold decoration.  These disciples from small villages would have felt that power and presence.  They must have felt something beyond amazement at the size and beauty of the structure.

All Jesus says is, "It's going to be a pile of rubble."

When the temple was utterly destroyed in 70 C.E., it must have been a shock.  Where was God?  What was going on?  Was this the end of the world?

When the Cathedral in Coventry was destroyed along with 2/3 of the city's buildings, perhaps the citizens felt much the same way.  The Cathedral that was more than 500 years old was a pile of rubble.  Where was God?  Was this the end of the world?

And, yet, out of that horrible night of terror and bombing, they were able to begin the process of forgiveness.

For the enemy who wants to destroy our way of life.

Father, forgive.

For humanity's role in death and destruction and war.

Father, forgive.

For our inability to live peacefully with our neighbors.

Father, forgive.

For greed and hubris and arrogance and evil.

Father, forgive.

Last night, most of us were glued to the newscasts of the terrorist attacks in Paris.  They were attacks of hate and evil and meant to hurt us at the deepest level.  This morning we watch as nations stand in solidarity with France as they try to begin the healing.

Further on in this scripture reading, Jesus warned the disciples about violence and suffering and natural disasters.  "This is but the beginning of the birth pangs."

Is the end near?  Or is our 21st century technology more adept at keeping us focused on disaster and war?  I only know that the birth pangs hurt and most days I pray, "Come, Lord Jesus."

I admire the people of Coventry who could say, "Father, forgive."  I admire their courage and their refusal to allow hate to grab hold of them.  Maybe they were able to look beyond the signs of what appeared to be end times and focus on the Christ who is to come.

It's all we can do, right now.  Focus on Christ at the center of all the chaos.  It's all we can do to know that God is God and that God is in charge.

And someday, maybe soon, we, too, can say, "Father, forgive."

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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November 8, 2016, 12:00 AM

Church at Home

Costly Discipleship

by Sandy Bach

As he taught, he said, "Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have the best seats in the synagogues and plces of honor at banquets! They devour widows houses and for the sake of appearance say long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation" (Mark 13:38-40 NRSV)

Then he called his disciples and said to them, "Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury. For all of them have contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on." (Mark 13:43-44 NRSV)

I used to be disturbed by the story of the widow's mite. She sacrificed to give to God what she had. And I would wonder what I could do to be sacrificial. What would it look like if I gave everything to God? Hm. That would mean being homeless and that wouldn't do much to improve our world.

Then the guilt would settle in. Is tithing enough? Am I doing enough? What more is God calling me to do? After a few days of angst and worry, something would come up and I could set aside the widow and her mite and move on to other things.

Today, I see this differently. And by taking the focus off of me, I broadened my reading. First, Jesus is angry with the status quo at the Temple. He loves his Jewish faith tradition and what the law stands for. The Temple officials are struggling to hold onto their traditions and their building. They live under Caesar's thumb and they have to be careful what they say and what they do. If they lose their Temple, they'll lose their ability to worship God.

Eventually they did lose the Temple, but they were able to reinvent themselves. During Jesus' day, they were scared. Their fear caused them to make poor decisions. Some of the religious leaders with fragile egos flaunted their power among their Jewish followers. It may have been the only way in which they could feel whole. Living as a conquered people does something to those people.

Jesus saw beyond it all. "Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces..." We've all met clergy who behaved in a pompous manner. They make Christianity look like an exclusive club. They are surrounded by those who can make them feel valuable.

Jesus gives his judgement on those who would hurt others with their arrogance and bad behavior. Then he walks over to another part of the Temple and sits down opposite the treasury. He watched the great amounts of money being given to the Temple. Then a widow arrives and puts in what we are led to believe are her last two coins.

And Jesus is exasperated, at least, even angry. Why would that widow be expected to give to the Temple? Why wasn't the Temple taking care of her? God's law demands that they care for the widow and orphan and resident alien. Why is she expected to give her last?

Luke's Gospel shares this, "From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded." (Luke 12:48b NRSV)

So those with wealth gave accordingly. It appears that they knew their responsibility and acted accordingly.

But, the widow gives her all. She gives everything she has to an institution that will be utterly destroyed soon. She gives everything she has to an institution that is hardly deserving of her sacrifice.

And that foreshadows what Christ will do in only a few days: he'll give everything he has, his very life, to us who are not deserving of his sacrifice.

What would it look like if we gave to those who are undeserving? How do we balance being good stewards with helping those who wait until the very last minute to get help with their electricity bills? How does the church use its mission dollars to help others?

So my question to myself is: Am I hanging on to an institutional church or sharing Jesus' calling with those who make me uncomfortable? Is the Church I love so much reaching out sacrifically? And if it isn't, what am I doing to hold it back?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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November 6, 2016, 8:35 AM

Hope for the Day of the Lord

by Sandy Bach

As to the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered together to him, we beg you, brothers and sisters, not to be quickly shaken in mind or alarmed, either by spirit or by word or by letter, as though from us, to the effect that the day of the Lord is already here. Let no one deceive you in any way; for that day will not come unless the rebellion comes first and the lawless one is revealed, the one destined for destruction. He opposes and exalts himself above every so-called god or object of worship, so that he takes his seat in the temple of God, declaring himself to be God. Do you not remember that I told you these things when I was still with you?

13 But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. 14 For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. 15 So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.

16 Now may our Lord Jesus Christ himself and God our Father, who loved us and through grace gave us eternal comfort and good hope, 17 comfort your hearts and strengthen them in every good work and word.  (2 Thessalonians 2:1-5;13-17 NRSV)

Tuesday is coming.
We can feel it.
It’s almost palpable.

Some of us will bid a fond farewell to our President wishing him well in his retirement.

Others will say good riddance, looking forward to something better.

Some of us will awaken Wednesday morning happy and relieved with the results of the election.

Others will feel dismayed, even frightened at the results.

It’s so easy to get wrapped up in the news. There’s too much information out there and much of it is skewed depending on the bias of the speaker. Politicians are in the business of telling us what is wrong with our country and that we should be very afraid.  Then they assure us that that they have the only possible answer.

Politicians have been providing the easy answers for as long as I can remember. But there are no easy answers.

Tuesday is coming. And with it more worry and fear and grief.

We feel like the congregation at Thessaloniki. They’ve heard the good news. They served faithfully. But, then someone stood up and announced the end was here.  Perhaps they claimed that God had spoken to them directly. The end was near. And now the Thessalonians are shaken out of their wits.

The author writes a reminder of what must happen before the end arrives. There are signs to look for and they haven’t seen them yet, have they? “Remember what I told you when I was with y ou.”

Chances are that some of the congregation took the letter and studied the signs. What will the rebellion look like? They pored over the details and became worried and fearful. They may even have come up with a date and time and so they could go to high mountain and wait for Christ’s return.

Others probably went back to their homes and jobs, trying to ignore them.  They understood that Christ will come and they aren't in control of it; let’s get back to work.

And a few may have studied the signs, realized the timing was wrong and took hope. They reaffirmed their belief that God is still in charge; that God is powerful and majestic; that no evil is more powerful than God.

These few stood firm and held on. They viewed the alarmist behavior; they understood that evil exists; they refused to ignore it while affirming that God is greater than any of this.

Ultimately good wins out over evil. Today’s worries are enough for today; God is waiting for us in the tomorrows of our lives.

Evil exists. We see it in the cancer racing through a young mother’s body; in the mental illness that leads another to make bad choices that hurt others. Evil exists in racist activities. Evil exists in the world, but we cannot allow it to scare us out of our wits.

Faithful people identify the evil and try to change the laws surrounding the treatment of mental illness. Faithful people care for those fighting the disease that wracks their bodies. Faithful people refuse to gloss over the facts; they bravely look in the mirror and ask what they are doing to keep bad policies alive.

Faithful people don’t try to identify the “lawless one” but rather seek to know in prayer, “Is it I?”

We are the ones created by our Creator. We need God as much today as they did in Thessaloniki. We cannot know the mind of God; we cannot control God by trying to please God. We cannot delude ourselves into thinking that we don’t need God or that we already know God’s mind.

Faithful people acknowledge this and return over and over and over again to reaffirm this and confess their need to take charge. Augustine once said that evil is the capacity of the self to deny and reject good.

Where you find people of faith, you find gratitude. Gratitude for Christ’s activity in their daily lives; gratitude to their Creator for the beauty of the earth; gratitude to the Holy Spirit for abiding presence.

Fearful times? Yes, they are. And in these times I turn to these words from Paul and to the prophet Haggai:  "...Yet now take courage, all you people of the land, says the Lord; work, for I am with you, says the Lord of hosts, according to the promise that I made you when you came out of Egypt.  My spirit abides among you; do not fear." (Haggai 2:4b-5 NRSV)

There is only one thing we can trust and believe. There is only one thing we need to remember and take comfort in: that when we awaken on Wednesday morning, God will still be in charge no matter who is elected.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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November 4, 2016, 12:14 AM

Zacchaues

by Sandy Bach

19 He entered Jericho and was passing through it. 2 A man was there named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector and was rich. 3 He was trying to see who Jesus was, but on account of the crowd he could not, because he was short in stature. 4 So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to see him, because he was going to pass that way. 5 When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down; for I must stay at your house today.” 6 So he hurried down and was happy to welcome him. 7 All who saw it began to grumble and said, “He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner.” 8 Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much.” 9 Then Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he too is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek out and to save the lost.”  (Luke 19:1-10 NRSV)

Today we celebrate Reformation Sunday.  It was on October 31, 1517 that Martin Luther nailed his "95 Theses" to the church door at Wittenberg.  He came to believe deeply that no one could earn their way to salvation and eternal life through good deeds or buying indulgences.  He believed that salvation was a free gift of God's grace.  It cost him his career in the Roman church when he was excommunicated four years later.

Thus began the Reformation Age, one of the great emergence's of Christianity.  In fact, it wasn't the first and it isn't the last.  According to author Phyllis Tickle ("The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why" (Grand Rapids, Baker Publishing Group, 2008)  we are part of a great emergence today.  The first was when Jesus walked among us with his powers of transformation.  Roughly 500 years later Pope Gregory the Great was the visionary of conversion to the pagans and influenced modern education.  His writings were extensive and still powerful reading today.

About 500 years after Gregory the Great came the Great Schism: Rome and the Eastern Orthodox Church went their separate ways.  Then Martin Luther with his 95 Theses in 1517.  About 500 years later we find ourselves in our own emergence.  Social and cultural and religious upheaval marks this Great Emergence.  We are caught up in this boat of Christianity hanging on for dear life, waiting out the storm to pass, desperately wishing and hoping to get back to normal.

Each of these 500-year events were difficult.  It entailed change and we don't do change well.  People lose their lives;  cultures react negatively; cultures clash; people become angry, saying and doing bad things in a desperate attempt to keep the status quo.  Sound familiar?

Scholars are split on the translation of verse 8b of our scripture passage today.  Some Bible translations read, "Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much." (Luke 19:8b NRSV)  However, other translations and scholars argue that Zacchaeus is already doing this action.  ""Look, Lord, I give half of my possessions to the poor.  And if I have cheated anyone, I repay them four times as much." (Luke 19:8b CEB)

I think we can make a case for either translation, but let's look at the second one.  Suppose Zacchaeus is an ethical tax collector?  We knows he's rich.  We know he collects taxes and has a great deal of power.  We also know that he was trying to meet Jesus.  We know that he isn't very popular with the crowds.

Notice how they elbow him out of the way when he tries to approach Jesus.  He finally has to run ahead and climb up a tree in order to see him.  Aren't we up a tree looking for Jesus?  Aren't we trying to make our way through the crowds?  Bumped by this one who doesn't believe the same things we do?  Nudged aside by another who is too busy climbing the social or career ladder?  Left out by those who look different from you?

We would see Jesus and do anything we can, including climbing a tree, to do so.

The crowds disown him.  Yet, if he's the ethical man he claims to be, what's going on?  The crowds don't know him or what he's doing.  What if he is the tax collector who slips in a little extra when someone comes up short?  He's the one who keeps the other tax collectors in line by refusing to allow them to extort money from the poor.  He does it quietly and not many know or care about his ethical activity.  So they ostracize him without even knowing him.  He's a tax collector and he's rich.  That's all they need to know in order to toss him aside to the fringes of society.

How are we the crowds today?  In our society where the loudest voice is heard; where fear and anger is rampant; where spinning the truth is more interesting; how do we ostracize others to the fringes without even getting to know them?  A friend of mine recently said she'd like to invite a Muslim to visit our small community and speak to her church.  My response was fear.  Not in meeting with a Muslim and entering into conversation.  I've studied Islam and read the Quran.  I'd like to hear more.

Truthfully, I don't have the nerve to push the boundaries and risk being ostracized myself.  I don't want to shake hands with Zacchaeus in public, but I'll meet with him privately so I won't be shamed.  We're the crowds when we judge others without getting to know them.

And that's part of this Great Emergence in which we're living.  Change is occurring at the speed of sound and we can't keep up with it.  Not all change is good and there's little time to figure out how our faith in Jesus speaks to each aspect of change in our lives.  Do we erect walls or build bridges?  How can we be relational when we can only see the sin?  Is the use of power bullying?  Is it a sign of weakness to seek peace?

Zacchaeus had had enough.  He was doing the best he could in a difficult situation and when he climbed up that tree it was in search of Jesus.  Maybe Jesus could shed light on his situation.  And he did.  In fact he did more than shed light, he offered a blessing.  Salvation came into the household of Zacchaeus that very moment.

Are you climbing trees these days?  I suspect we all are.  Maybe it's time to pick up our Bibles and study them for ourselves.  Maybe it's time to quit listening to just anyone telling you what the Bible really means.  Maybe it's time to slow down this Great Emergence by entering into study with others who are asking the questions and seeking answers that aren't necessarily easy and may even convict us.

Call it what  you want, God is at work tipping us out of our comfort zones and challenging us to think; to be less angry and more inquisitive; to gather information from a variety of sources; to listen carefully to those with whom we disagree.  God is at work nudging us into new challenges and opportunities and ideas.

God is at work.  And whether you find yourself up a tree or mixing with the crowd, Jesus will find you.

I hope and pray that you will answer the call and become a part of the solution.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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