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July 2, 2017, 12:00 AM

The Summons 3

by Sandy Bach

40 “Whoever welcomes you welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me. 41 Whoever welcomes a prophet in the name of a prophet will receive a prophet’s reward; and whoever welcomes a righteous person in the name of a righteous person will receive the reward of the righteous; 42 and whoever gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones in the name of a disciple—truly I tell you, none of these will lose their reward.”  (Matthew 10:40-42 NRSV)

Doris (not her real name) dropped by the church office earlier this week.  "Hi, Doris.  Haven't seen you in awhile.  You doing okay?"

"No.  I just got out of jail."

Oh, dear.  It seems that she broke a law or two trying to hang onto her apartment and get food.  She lost her benefits as a result.  She lost what was left of her self-esteem.  But, she hasn't lost hope.

She needed fuel for her automobile, but not too much.  Her gas tank leaks.  She also needed some paper towels, toilet paper and dish soap.  That's all.  It was easy to fill her needs of the moment.  It was warm out and she was breathing heavy, so we lingered for a few minutes.

She shared more about how she ended up in jail; what her next steps were (which she could move forward on since she now had gas for her car) and asked how I was doing.  I shared a few things with her and she volunteered to hold me in prayer.  We prayed together after I gave her some water and she went on her way.

These visits happen quite a bit.  Not just with Doris, but with others.  The need is usually emergency groceries, help with utilities or gas for the car.  I provide what our small church can afford and walk away praying.  And wishing I could say something more eloquently or provide more than I have.  A magic wand would be the ticket.

This time, something else happened.  As Doris and I walked to the door, we shared a bit of small talk and then she headed out and I returned to my office.  What was it about this visit that made me feel good?

Was it that I had relaxed more and listened more carefully to Doris' story?  Did I perhaps say the right thing, after all?  Maybe it was the prayer I prayed while holding her dirty, sweaty hands.

It was none of those things.  It was Doris.  Doris had trusted me enough to share why she lost her benefits.  She didn't lie about the jail sentence.  She risked that I would help her even though she had broken the law.  (She broke the law for survival reasons.)

Doris had shown me a form of hospitality.  But wait.  Isn't that my job?

Hospitality is a big word with big meanings.  It's more than the simple welcome to the stranger or the purchase of some gasoline for someone trying to get to work.  It isn't welcoming those who look like us, with our particular educational level (although, they deserve welcome, as well.)

Hospitality goes deeper.  It's aware of deep need.  It doesn't judge.  Hospitality is love met with love.  Not the syrupy kind of love, but that tough, gritty love that Jesus displayed over and over again.

Hospitality demands that we look at the sinfulness in our own lives and repent any position of privilege we may hold.  Hospitality isn't about us, but about the one God puts in our pathway.

Hospitality feels awkward, at times.  We keep working at it.  Hospitality acknowledges that God is at work and so we depend on God for the right words, the right thoughts (not necessarily pious ones, either!) Hospitality gives and receives God's grace.  Hospitality opens us up to the needs of others: emotional, physical, spiritual.  The entire person.

Hospitality is compassionate.  It's open and honest, free of manipulation and desire for personal gain.  Hospitality has its own reward.

Hospitality meets the other where they are.  It walks with Jesus and tries to discern what Jesus would have us do.  It knows that things get distorted, that sometimes we'll get taken.  But, that doesn't matter, because for just a moment the receiver got a glimpse of grace.

So what do we do?  We notice the person that crosses our path and we pray what the Spirit tells us what to pray.  We acknowledge that what we see may not be reality and if it is, we refuse to judge.

We listen carefully to the needs of others and what God would have us do. We pray for guidance and understanding.  We eschew any attitude that has a simple answer for the ills in our society.

Doris helped me last week.  She embraced me with honesty and trust.  She taught me a few more tricks that the poor do to simply get through their day.  God was present in that moment and I hope I'll see Doris again.

The Doris' of the world remind me who I am and to whom I belong.  The Doris' of the world remind me that my main job in this world is hospitality.

Even when I don't like the look or the smell or the attitude of the one who God puts in my path.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




June 25, 2017, 12:00 AM

The Summons 2

by Sandy Bach

24 “A disciple is not above the teacher, nor a slave above the master; 25 it is enough for the disciple to be like the teacher, and the slave like the master. If they have called the master of the house Beelzebul, how much more will they malign those of his household!

26 “So have no fear of them; for nothing is covered up that will not be uncovered, and nothing secret that will not become known. 27 What I say to you in the dark, tell in the light; and what you hear whispered, proclaim from the housetops. 28 Do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.[a] 29 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father. 30 And even the hairs of your head are all counted. 31 So do not be afraid; you are of more value than many sparrows.

32 “Everyone therefore who acknowledges me before others, I also will acknowledge before my Father in heaven; 33 but whoever denies me before others, I also will deny before my Father in heaven.

34 “Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.

35 For I have come to set a man against his father,
and a daughter against her mother,
and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law;
36 and one’s foes will be members of one’s own household.

37 Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me; 38 and whoever does not take up the cross and follow me is not worthy of me. 39 Those who find their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it.  (Matthew 10:24-39 NRSV)

Last week, Jesus summoned us to the harvest.  He announced that the "harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest." (Mt 9:37b-38 NRSV)

Be careful what you pray for.  You just might be the solution.  As were the disciples.  The news that we're the laborers for the harvest is uncomfortable, indeed.

Our names are called along with those 12 motley disciples who Jesus commissioned to be Apostles.  Simon Peter, the denier.  The one who specialized in Public Relations -- what we do must not look bad.  Eventually Jesus has to tell him, "Get behind me, Satan."

Andrew, James and John. fishermen.  Two of them left their father behind in order to join up with Jesus.  They understand what it means to love Jesus more than family.

Matthew, who had colluded with the Romans as a tax collector.  Simon the Zealot who fought against the Roman Empire.

Judas.  The one who betrayed Jesus.

These are the people Jesus chose.  And we're the ones he chooses today.

Last week he began his Apostleship 101 Class.  Pack light.  Bring healing and grace with you.  Let God provide what you need -- don't get wrapped up with matters of safety.

Today, Jesus continues his teachings on discipleship and apostleship.  The student is no better than the teacher any more than the laborer earns more than the boss.  Be like the teacher, though.  But, don't expect more than the him.  People have berated Jesus for 2,000 years.  Don't expect anything better.

What Jesus is teaching in his small class will be out in the light of day.  He warns them, and us, that we'll be bullied and booed.  But, remember.  They may hurt you.  They may even break your heart.  But, they can't break your soul.  Only God is capable of that.

But, that won't happen.  Just look at God's love for His creation.  Sparrows abound and we sell them for pennies.  Yet God knows each and every one of them.  Not a one dies that God doesn't know about.  How  much more is your worth to God?  God's got your back!

Life isn't nice and easy.  Life is made up of choices and consequences.  Evil exists.  People do bad things and make poor decisions.  Stand up for Jesus.  Stand up for that which is Christ-like, even though it may be unpopular, even costly.

Take courage.  Jesus has your back!

So, if life is difficult, know that Jesus' way is not easy and comfortable.  Loving Jesus more than family is part of the summons.  As important as families are, Jesus must come first.

Everything else comes second to God.  Family, career, money, life itself.  When we chase after these things, we put up barriers to God and we lose ourselves.

Can you hear the master's voice calling you?  It's a firm call but one that must be heard over the noise of life, despite our restless hearts.  A summons to allow worldly treasures to take second chair.  A summons that speaks to us in spite of joys and sorrows.

Yet, when we hear his voice and follow, something happens: an indescribable joy that our lives and our talents and gifts are useful, even necessary, to God's purpose.  An awe inspiring joy when we realize that we can make a difference in the kingdom.

That joy remains with us, even when we are questioned, bullied, or even martyred.  Joy at serving Jesus takes precedence over everything else, even bringing salt and spice and perfume to our lives because we find our authentic selves.

We live and move and have our being because Jesus called and we listened and followed.

So, disciple of the Master.  When you are "sent out," to where and to whom do you bring grace?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




June 21, 2017, 12:00 AM

Who Do We Worship?

by Sandy Bach

22 Then Paul stood in front of the Areopagus and said, “Athenians, I see how extremely religious you are in every way. 23 For as I went through the city and looked carefully at the objects of your worship, I found among them an altar with the inscription, ‘To an unknown god.’ What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you. 24 The God who made the world and everything in it, he who is Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in shrines made by human hands, 25 nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mortals life and breath and all things. 26 From one ancestor[a] he made all nations to inhabit the whole earth, and he allotted the times of their existence and the boundaries of the places where they would live, 27 so that they would search for God[b] and perhaps grope for him and find him—though indeed he is not far from each one of us. 28 For ‘In him we live and move and have our being’; as even some of your own poets have said,

‘For we too are his offspring.’

29 Since we are God’s offspring, we ought not to think that the deity is like gold, or silver, or stone, an image formed by the art and imagination of mortals. 30 While God has overlooked the times of human ignorance, now he commands all people everywhere to repent, 31 because he has fixed a day on which he will have the world judged in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed, and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead.”  (Acts 17:22-31 NRSV)

He wandered through the streets of Athens gazing upon one statue after another.  He was amazed and distressed.  These weren't simply works of art.  They were idols.  They represented the gods that the Athenians proudly worshiped.  Some of them represented the best in humanity.  Others the very worst.

Perhaps he saw Aphrodite's likeness, goddess of love, desire and beauty.  She represented sex, affection and the kind of attraction that binds people together.  Or Apollo, god of music, healing, light and truth.  Then there was Ares, the god war represented by raw violence.  His companions were fear and terror.

These gods that were worshiped came from dysfunctional families.  They did harmful, even disgusting, things to each other.  They were more human than divine.  They cared only for themselves.

Paul had had enough.  Wandering from one statue to another, he felt disgusted.  Daily he argued in the synagogue and the marketplace.  He talked to anyone who would listen.  When he stumbled across some highly respected philosophers, they took him to the Council of Aeropagus, also known as Mars Hill.

How should he defend himself?  No.  He won't defend himself.  Instead, he'll share what he knows about the one true living God of heaven and earth.

How should he begin?  By meeting the people where they are.  They are polytheistic, worshiping many gods.  Start there.  And he begins by noting how religious the people are.  Why they even have an altar dedicated 'to an unknown god.'  Great place to begin.  And he shares with them who this god is.

Who do we worship?  Strolling through our culture, we see worshipers of sex and desire and beauty.  We meet up with raw violence and terror and fear.  There are gods and idols wherever we go.  Ever felt fear that you might run out of  money despite a bulging bank book?  Welcome to the god of the fear of scarcity.  Rooting for someone's demise?  You could be flirting with the god of power.

Who we worship is the one true living God.  Paul describes God in a way no earthly god could ever come close to emulating.  God is God of not just earth but also heaven.  This is our creator.  Not content to recline in temples and holy structures, God accompanies us wherever we are.  This isn't the God who demands to be taken care of.  Rather, God takes care of us.

This God is inclusive, creating all of humanity.  We are the ones who can search, even grope around, and find God right there.

We worship the God of love who packed a suitcase and moved out Eden behind Adam and Eve; who marked the murderer Cain so that he wouldn't be killed; who accompanied Judeans in exile to Babylon; who sent his only son to be with us and die for us.

We worship the God of justice who stands tall and announces that he loves us so much, that he won't stand for our misbehavior any longer; who tests us like iron; who allows us to fail so that we can eventually succeed; who yearns for our repentance; who creates in us a clean heart for life made new.

We worship the God of power.  Power greater than any human could dream of.

We worship the God of healing and peace.

Our God isn't involved in some dysfunctional life, thinking only of himself.  Our God is waiting for us to grope around and discover that he's been there all along.  God isn't our cosmic bell hop but God provides for our needs.

You can't run from our God, but you can ignore him.  You can't hide, but you are free to make your own decisions.  And this God is waiting for you.  Loving arms ready to enfold and provide.

If you haven't tried it lately, go ahead.  Grope around.  You'll bump into all kinds of grace.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




June 18, 2017, 12:00 AM

The Summons 1

by Sandy Bach

Matthew 9:35-10:23

So much work. So little time.

Jesus moves through one city or village after another. All he sees is need. He heals one and five more get in line. Life is hard under Roman rule, especially for the occupied Jews. Tired and ready for rest, Jesus looks up and sees trouble and sickness.

I can hear him commenting to some of his disciples near by, "The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Pray for help."

I think I know what he means. And I wonder if you also understand.

The church has seen decline since 1965. Mega Churches have stepedping into the breach; new faith communities have begun to reach out to a variety of needs; some of the mainline churches have managed to remain relevant in this new age. Still, we see too much poverty and disease; the rich getting richer on the backs of the poor; rage and antagonism that leads to hurt, even killing.

Jesus hits on a creative solution.  His disciples have been watching, probably helping.  It's time to send them out.  So, he designates 12 men, and promotes them to apostles ("sent ones.")  He commissions them, possibly with a laying on of hands.  He gives them authority over unclean spirits and to heal disease and sickness.  No mention of evangelizing.  No plan for growing the church.  No altar calls.  Just get out there and heal.

First, they'll need some training.  Start close to home, by working only with the house of Israel.  Don't pack a suitcase.  You won't need it.  Time is of the essence, so get to work.  God will provide folks to feed and house you.  And remember.  No matter how great the job and the awesome works you perform, some will come after you.  Others will reject you.  Shake it off.  Move on.

I believe we're summoned today to do the same.  We are commissioned to heal and cast out demons and set people free.  Though I've heard that exorcists and faith healers exist, I'm not one of them.  All I can do is pray and reach out, depending on the Holy Spirit for words to express healing and love.

Can we do more than that?  Yes, prayer is powerful.  More powerful than we can imagine.  But, Jesus needs us to be out there, as well.  Where do we begin?

Maybe by pointing out that which is toxic.  Rage that leads to killing.  Hatred of those who don't look like us.  Lies and deceit.  Point to it while affirming that God is already at work, healing and curing.

Maybe by being aware of those who live in the tombs of illness, abuse, and pain. Of depression and anxiety and worry.  Affirm God's resurrection power.  Allow the Holy Spirit to speak through you.

Maybe we can connect with the untouchables: those in poverty, who are mentally ill, who are diseased.  Remind us that God intends for all of us to be in community, not just a few.  There are no outcasts in God's kingdom.

Most of all, be aware of evil and its power, even as we sing praises to God who is more powerful than any evil we may encounter.

Sound easy? No, it's hard.  It requires us to travel light and keep alert.  It means that we focus on those who God causes to cross our path and we say or do what we feel compelled to say or do.  After all, those may be the words and actions of the Spirit.

Don't be surprised at who crosses your path.  None of us can say that we don't ever feel toxic rage or hate or feel anxious and depressed.  Many of us have been struck with an illness that kept us separated from others for long periods of time.  And we need only turn on our TV's and radios to know that evil and its power exist.  Sometimes we are the ones who reach out and some days we need someone to reach out to us with the reminder that God's got this.  Whatever it is.

Jesus calls us and sends us out.  That's the heart of Christianity: that we are saved by grace through faith and then we go into the world to proclaim it.  We are disciples who sit at the Master's feet and we are apostles, the "sent ones" who see illness and evil and abuse and pain for what it is.  And we state with utter confidence that, "God's got this!"  Even this.

Now here's the question and the charge: Jesus is summoning you.  Yes, you.

How will you respond?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




June 10, 2017, 12:00 AM

God, the Creator

by Sandy Bach

Genesis 1:1-2:4a

As the year 1968 came to a close, it was with deep sadness and grief.  It had been a difficult year for Americans: the assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.; the escalation of the Vietnam War; and civil unrest across college and university campuses.  The gift on Christmas Eve that year was unlike any other.

If you were alive on Christmas Eve, 1968, you may have heard the Apollo 8 astronauts' (Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders) live broadcast from lunar orbit.  We viewed pictures of Earth and the moon as seen from lunar orbit and Jim Lovell remarked, "The vast loneliness is awe-inspiring and it makes you realize just what you have back there on Earth." And then the crew took turns reading Genesis 1.

As we attended Christmas Eve worship to celebrate the arrival of the Prince of Peace, many of us felt hope and awe and peace.

Dr. Edgar Mitchell became the sixth human to walk on the moon's surface as part of the 1971 Apollo 14 mission.  This is what he reported back,

"Suddenly, from behind the rim of the moon, in long, slow-motion moments of immense majesty, there emerges a sparkling blue and white jewel, a light, delicate sky-blue laced with slowly swirling veils of white, rising gradually like a small pearl in a thick sea of black mystery.  It takes more than moment to fully realize this is Earth...home."  (http://friendsofsilence.net/quote/2009/03/suddenly-behind-rim-moon)

When God created the heavens and the earth, God had a plan.  It was a plan that required creativity, imagination and love.  Because, this was a special project.  God's breath hovered over the waters, like God's Spirit overshadowed Mary, the soon-to-be mother of Jesus.  Creation occurred in steps, not at one time.  Not even in one day.

First, the habitat was created: light and dark; day and night.  Then the sky to separate waters above from the waters below.  And finally, land and plants.  God stood back and said, "Yes!  That's good!  Now we're ready."

Light appeared in the form of stars and sun and moon.  Not static light, though.  Light that  would assist us in knowing seasons and days and years.  Then the birds and creatures from the sea.  And finally, God's ultimate triumph: animals and humans.  "Yes!  That's good!  Now we're ready."

It must have been an amazing sight.  God's breath hovering over the waters; the crashing noise of water separated from water; the booming movement of water to expose land; the silence of night; the eruption of the sun.  Fish swam through the beautiful blue waters or thrashed their way up the rapids to spawn.  Birds flew overhead looking for nesting material; larger birds dive-bombing for food.

Did God laugh with delight?  You bet ya!  God laughed and delighted and spent time enjoying each day of creation.  Without God there was no life.

Did God create a rigid and mechanical world?  Not at all.  God had a plan based on love that is flexible.  This creation would be sustainable and strong and delicate and fragile all at the same time.

God spent three days of eternity designing and plotting and organizing a place for stars and sun and moon and animals and plants of every kind.  God's ultimate creative activity, though, was you and I.

The Psalmist writes in the 8th Psalm, "When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars that you have established; what are human beings that you are mindful of them, mortals that you care for them?" (Ps 8:3-4 NRSV)

Edgar Mitchell said it just as eloquently as he stood on the moon watching the Earth rise: "It takes more than a moment to fully realize this is Earth...home."

This is creation.  The beginning of us.  The beginning of covenant with God.  In that covenant we were told to be fruitful and multiply and to take care of God's lesser creatures.  We were given dominion, not domination.

And here's where the debate begins.  We have numerous theories: that creation happened in exactly six days; that the earth isn't billions of  years old but only 5,000 to 6,000 years old; that Jesus' return is imminent therefore we don't have to worry about how we care for the earth; that we are evolved from chimpanzees; that the earth was formed from the Big Bang Theory; that someone had to be there to light the match.

I know what I believe.  And I know that others disagree with me.  At the same time, I wonder if we might agree on this: that God created an amazing world with amazing creatures that we're still discovering today.  That God formed all of this in order to be in relationship with us, who keep getting it wrong even as we continue to receive God's cup of grace.  That God isn't done, yet.

God isn't finished with the creative process.  God isn't finished with us.  God is still at work surprising us with revelations of beauty and laughter and new things available to us every day.

So, whether the world ends today or thousands of years hence, don't be shy about loving and caring for this planet in any way you can.  Don't be afraid to listen to others before making an informed decision.

Most of all, embrace this God who is still active in the world.  And look at those pictures of earth from space and wonder in awe about this "sparkling blue and white jewel..." The one we call home.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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