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November 4, 2016, 12:14 AM

Zacchaues

by Sandy Bach

19 He entered Jericho and was passing through it. 2 A man was there named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector and was rich. 3 He was trying to see who Jesus was, but on account of the crowd he could not, because he was short in stature. 4 So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to see him, because he was going to pass that way. 5 When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down; for I must stay at your house today.” 6 So he hurried down and was happy to welcome him. 7 All who saw it began to grumble and said, “He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner.” 8 Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much.” 9 Then Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he too is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek out and to save the lost.”  (Luke 19:1-10 NRSV)

Today we celebrate Reformation Sunday.  It was on October 31, 1517 that Martin Luther nailed his "95 Theses" to the church door at Wittenberg.  He came to believe deeply that no one could earn their way to salvation and eternal life through good deeds or buying indulgences.  He believed that salvation was a free gift of God's grace.  It cost him his career in the Roman church when he was excommunicated four years later.

Thus began the Reformation Age, one of the great emergence's of Christianity.  In fact, it wasn't the first and it isn't the last.  According to author Phyllis Tickle ("The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why" (Grand Rapids, Baker Publishing Group, 2008)  we are part of a great emergence today.  The first was when Jesus walked among us with his powers of transformation.  Roughly 500 years later Pope Gregory the Great was the visionary of conversion to the pagans and influenced modern education.  His writings were extensive and still powerful reading today.

About 500 years after Gregory the Great came the Great Schism: Rome and the Eastern Orthodox Church went their separate ways.  Then Martin Luther with his 95 Theses in 1517.  About 500 years later we find ourselves in our own emergence.  Social and cultural and religious upheaval marks this Great Emergence.  We are caught up in this boat of Christianity hanging on for dear life, waiting out the storm to pass, desperately wishing and hoping to get back to normal.

Each of these 500-year events were difficult.  It entailed change and we don't do change well.  People lose their lives;  cultures react negatively; cultures clash; people become angry, saying and doing bad things in a desperate attempt to keep the status quo.  Sound familiar?

Scholars are split on the translation of verse 8b of our scripture passage today.  Some Bible translations read, "Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much." (Luke 19:8b NRSV)  However, other translations and scholars argue that Zacchaeus is already doing this action.  ""Look, Lord, I give half of my possessions to the poor.  And if I have cheated anyone, I repay them four times as much." (Luke 19:8b CEB)

I think we can make a case for either translation, but let's look at the second one.  Suppose Zacchaeus is an ethical tax collector?  We knows he's rich.  We know he collects taxes and has a great deal of power.  We also know that he was trying to meet Jesus.  We know that he isn't very popular with the crowds.

Notice how they elbow him out of the way when he tries to approach Jesus.  He finally has to run ahead and climb up a tree in order to see him.  Aren't we up a tree looking for Jesus?  Aren't we trying to make our way through the crowds?  Bumped by this one who doesn't believe the same things we do?  Nudged aside by another who is too busy climbing the social or career ladder?  Left out by those who look different from you?

We would see Jesus and do anything we can, including climbing a tree, to do so.

The crowds disown him.  Yet, if he's the ethical man he claims to be, what's going on?  The crowds don't know him or what he's doing.  What if he is the tax collector who slips in a little extra when someone comes up short?  He's the one who keeps the other tax collectors in line by refusing to allow them to extort money from the poor.  He does it quietly and not many know or care about his ethical activity.  So they ostracize him without even knowing him.  He's a tax collector and he's rich.  That's all they need to know in order to toss him aside to the fringes of society.

How are we the crowds today?  In our society where the loudest voice is heard; where fear and anger is rampant; where spinning the truth is more interesting; how do we ostracize others to the fringes without even getting to know them?  A friend of mine recently said she'd like to invite a Muslim to visit our small community and speak to her church.  My response was fear.  Not in meeting with a Muslim and entering into conversation.  I've studied Islam and read the Quran.  I'd like to hear more.

Truthfully, I don't have the nerve to push the boundaries and risk being ostracized myself.  I don't want to shake hands with Zacchaeus in public, but I'll meet with him privately so I won't be shamed.  We're the crowds when we judge others without getting to know them.

And that's part of this Great Emergence in which we're living.  Change is occurring at the speed of sound and we can't keep up with it.  Not all change is good and there's little time to figure out how our faith in Jesus speaks to each aspect of change in our lives.  Do we erect walls or build bridges?  How can we be relational when we can only see the sin?  Is the use of power bullying?  Is it a sign of weakness to seek peace?

Zacchaeus had had enough.  He was doing the best he could in a difficult situation and when he climbed up that tree it was in search of Jesus.  Maybe Jesus could shed light on his situation.  And he did.  In fact he did more than shed light, he offered a blessing.  Salvation came into the household of Zacchaeus that very moment.

Are you climbing trees these days?  I suspect we all are.  Maybe it's time to pick up our Bibles and study them for ourselves.  Maybe it's time to quit listening to just anyone telling you what the Bible really means.  Maybe it's time to slow down this Great Emergence by entering into study with others who are asking the questions and seeking answers that aren't necessarily easy and may even convict us.

Call it what  you want, God is at work tipping us out of our comfort zones and challenging us to think; to be less angry and more inquisitive; to gather information from a variety of sources; to listen carefully to those with whom we disagree.  God is at work nudging us into new challenges and opportunities and ideas.

God is at work.  And whether you find yourself up a tree or mixing with the crowd, Jesus will find you.

I hope and pray that you will answer the call and become a part of the solution.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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October 23, 2016, 12:00 AM

Divine Mercy

by Sandy Bach

9 He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: 10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.’ 13 But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’ 14 I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted.”  (Luke 18:9-14 NRSV)

A few months ago I attended an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting at the invitation of a friend.  What struck me was the honesty and transparency of those working the program.  They don't excuse themselves for anything.  They want something better for themselves than what can be found in a bottle.

But what struck me the most was their humility.  Someone would announce that they'd been sober for one week.  Another for 20 years.  No celebration.  No "atta-boys."  They are very clear that they didn't remain sober for any amount of time by their own abilities.  They're sober because they have to rely on their higher power.

As I drove home from the meeting that night I couldn't help but think about this parable of Jesus' about the Pharisee and the tax collector.

The tax collector is probably a thug.  He's a Jew who works for Rome collecting tolls,tariffs and customs.  Rome doesn't much care how he collects the money as long as they receive it on time.  Whatever he can extort for his own fees is his own business.  His reputation keeps him on the fringes of Jewish society.  He's aiding and abetting the enemy and using his Jewish roots to get rich.

When I see the phrase "tax collector" in the gospels I don't think of our own IRS.  I think about organized crime.

It had to have been difficult to be a Pharisee in the first century.  These were highly educated men with admirable piety.  They were skilled at Biblical interpretation and lived a modest lifestyle.  Their faith was strong probably because they prayed often.

Pharisees refused to swear allegiance to Caesar which would have gotten them into a lot of trouble.  They believed in some kind of an afterlife and divine judgement after death.

They were the progressive thinkers of their day.  And they walked a fine line keeping Rome happy so they could continue to worship in the temple.  It must have been difficult for them.

In a conversation with a seminary professor many years ago, he challenged us when he said, "Whenever you read 'Pharisee' in the gospels, substitute that word with 'Presbyterian' or 'Methodist' or your own faith tradition's identity.

Yep.  That's us.  Working hard at understanding our faith.  Struggling through the difficult times.  Helping others in times of sorrow or difficulty.  Trying to do the right thing.  Trying to live right without hurting others.  There are hundreds of thousands of us out there in the world trying to make a difference; trying to make a living; trying to be somebody.

Did you notice the number of times the Pharisee says "I" or "me?"  His piety isn't of God or from God.  He's done it all by himself.  It isn't that he's not greedy or unjust or an adulterer.  In fact, he fasts more often and gives more to God than is required by law.

The problem is that he's relying on his own acts to justify himself.  Justification comes from God.  And his hard work and attitude are getting in the way of his relationship with God.  Unlike the alcoholic or addict, he can't see that he is totally dependent on God.

While the Pharisee stands tall and looks up to heaven,  the tax collector stands to the side, looking downward and beating his chest.  "God, be merciful to me, a sinner!"  He has nothing to offer God but himself and his sinfulness.

He stands before God with no excuses and no expectations.  He receives a new identity.

Where are you in this text?  Chances are you're not much of a tax collector!  But how do you judge tax collectors?  You see them everywhere: undocumented aliens, gays, lesbians, transgender, black, white, male, female, Democrat, Republican...Who do you judge harshly without seeing their humanity first?

Who do you judge as beneath you while you stand before God and give thanks that you're not like them?

How often have you exalted yourself only to be humbled?

We don't live by our own righteousness.  We don't justify ourselves before God; we present ourselves naked and sinful before the Creator and seek mercy and give thanks.

We don't justify ourselves.  We live and breathe and have our being by God's mercy.

And perhaps the good news is that when we seek mercy and give thanks, we go out into the world with new identities that others can see and want to be a part of it.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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October 16, 2016, 12:00 AM

Persistent Prayer

by Sandy Bach

18 Then Jesus[a] told them a parable about their need to pray always and not to lose heart. 2 He said, “In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor had respect for people. 3 In that city there was a widow who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Grant me justice against my opponent.’ 4 For a while he refused; but later he said to himself, ‘Though I have no fear of God and no respect for anyone, 5 yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will grant her justice, so that she may not wear me out by continually coming.’”[b] 6 And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. 7 And will not God grant justice to his chosen ones who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long in helping them? 8 I tell you, he will quickly grant justice to them. And yet, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?”  (Luke 18:1-8 NRSV)

She awakens every morning with single-minded resolve.  She dresses quickly in her best, although threadbare, dress.  As the sun rises her neighbors watch her marching with steadfast determination to the home of the judge who thinks she's not worth the effort.  She pounds on the door until her fingers bleed.  When he finally answers, she demands, "Give me justice against my opponent!"

The uncaring, unscrupulous judge slams the door in her face.  She treads back home, tired but not finished.  She'll return tomorrow and the the next day and the next until she achieves justice.

Finally, the judge gives in.  Not because he sees her point of view; not because he even cares.  He gives in to get her off his back.  His wife is tired of the embarrassment of this "creature" pounding on her door and disturbing the neighbors.  So, the sidelined widow achieves her purpose and can resume her former life.  Eventually her bruised hand will heal along with her heart.

Jesus asks at the end of this parable, "...when the Son of Man comes,will he find faith on earth?" (v. 8)  He will find it in those who behave like the widow; uncaring of what others think, unflinching in their devotion to their cause.

I have developed a new respect and admiration for the writer's of the Psalms.  They address God with courage: "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?  Why are you so far from helping me, from the words of my groaning?" (Psalm 22:1)  Are they accusing God of being silent; of walking away; of forsaking them in their hour of need?   No.  They are clearly and honestly telling God that they're feeling alone and Godforsaken.  They're recognizing the pain of losing that sense of being in God's presence.

I admire that.  Since the time of Jacob who wrestled with God at the Jabok River, the Jews have been known as God-wrestlers.  And so they continue to do so today.  They're not afraid to talk to God with utter honestly.  They pray with perseverance.  They acknowledge not only that they feel as if God is silent, they complain loudly.  "But I am a worm, and not human; scorned by others, and despised by the people.  All who see me mock at me, they shake their heads:"  (Psalm 22:6-7 NRSV)

They shout out, they call God out.  And they do it because they know that God really is present and listening.  They easily confess their trust in God and state their petitions knowing and trusting that God is listening.  "From you comes my praise in the great congregation; my vows I will pay before those who fear him." (Psalm 22:25 NRSV)

What begins as words of complaint and sorrow quickly turn to words that assure the pray-er that God is indeed near and listening.  That God will respond and will not go away.

In fact it was the words of Psalm 22 that Jesus cried out from the cross:  "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Matthew 27:45; Mark 15:34 NRSV)

When the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?

I believe he will.  He'll find people like the widow who remain in prayer, seeking out God and asking, "Why are you delayed in answering my prayer?  Only to discover that God has it well in hand and is often at work, not with what we want but with what we need.  He'll find people who persevere in prayer because they haven't an answer; only a need that they can't fill with God's help.

The widow persevered until her knuckles were bruised.  Prayer is like that.  It's asking and listening and arguing and fighting back.  It's seeking and complaining and trusting and confessing.  Prayer is filled with words and silence.  Prayer is messy at its best and poignant in it's power to achieve justice.

Will the Son of Man find faith on earth?

Yes, he will.  Because as much as we want to congratulate ourselves when we behave like a widow, we honestly have to give credit to God, who also perseveres with us. God is also the widow who sticks with us; who never gives up; who won't let go.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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October 9, 2016, 12:00 AM

Gospel Message

by Sandy Bach

Remember Jesus Christ, raised from the dead, a descendant of David—that is my gospel, for which I suffer hardship, even to the point of being chained like a criminal. But the word of God is not chained. 10 Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, so that they may also obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus, with eternal glory. 11 The saying is sure:

If we have died with him, we will also live with him;
12 if we endure, we will also reign with him;
if we deny him, he will also deny us;
13 if we are faithless, he remains faithful—
for he cannot deny himself.

14 Remind them of this, and warn them before God that they are to avoid wrangling over words, which does no good but only ruins those who are listening. 15 Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved by him, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly explaining the word of truth.  (2 Timothy 2:8-15 NRSV)

 

Several years ago my mother attended a Sunday school class taught by a close friend of hers. The title of the class sounded interesting and she trusted her friend to do a good job.  Week after week she attended. And week after week I’d receive a phone call from her on Sunday afternoons. Each time she asked me about the truthfulness of Betty’s teaching.

“Mom, it really doesn’t matter what I believe. What do you believe?”

For several weeks this went on. Until I finally suggested that Mom find a different class. You see, the material Betty had selected was interesting, but provocative. Betty did her best to provoke the class. Mom felt that her friend was demeaning her beliefs rather than lifting them up.

Paul writes to Timothy about idle chatter. It seems that some of the members of the church at Ephesus are espousing that the second resurrection has already taken place. They offer classes, for a fee, that show people how to achieve spiritual nirvana, escaping the drudgery of life in this world.

It’s tearing the church apart. "Speak the truth,” Paul tells Timothy. “It’s gotten me into a lot of trouble, but the truth can’t be chained.”

Today, we try to find truth and it gets lost. Our post-modern era is less black and white and more shades of grey. These shades of grey are taken on as absolute truth and we’re left feeling foolish or angry or that we have it all wrong. It can even lead to damaging our faith.

Paul is in prison and winter is coming in more ways than one. It’s getting cold and he needs his cloak while he faces possible execution for his Christian beliefs. And though we don’t suffer nearly what Paul or other martyrs experienced, we can certainly relate to the questions and the momentary lapses of faith.

“What if they’re right? Am I looking at it the wrong way?”

And just when you wonder what to do, Paul gives us a guideline:
Remember.
Remind.
Be diligent.

The truth for us, as Christians, is that Jesus suffered on a cross and rose from the dead. We remember this when we re-affirm our Baptism vows. We died in the baptismal waters with Jesus and rose with him to eternal life.

The truth for us, as Christians, is that Jesus died for us and we are redeemed in that death. We remember this every time we witness poverty, social injustice, or anything that damages God’s coming kingdom.

We remember Jesus’ resurrection every time we enter into worship.

We remember Jesus’ activity while he walked among us. We pray for guidance and to walk with him, because we remember our baptism. That we died and were raised with him.

And we remind others.

A seminary professor of long-standing arrived in the President’s office one morning. He had suffered at the hands of Nazi Germany and had managed to escape and come to America with his wife some 30 years earlier. Recently, though, his wife had died. It was more than he could handle. He was through.

“I’m quitting,” he announced to the President. “I’m leaving the seminary. I don’t believe anymore.”

The wise President told him, “You’re not quitting. We’ll believe for you until you can believe for yourself again.”

Be diligent. Sometimes it’s hard to be diligent. It’s when life is going well that we need to be the most diligent. Because when times get difficult, we need that deepened faith. We also need the faith of our community to help us through. We believe and we worship and pray together; we believe and we commune and fellowship together. Sometimes we believe for others.

Remember. Remind. Be diligent.

Creationism vs. Evolution.
We don’t know for sure.
Christ is risen.
Of that we can be sure.

Universalism. Are we all going to heaven or just some of us?
We don’t know for sure.
Christ is risen.
Of that we can be sure.

Homosexuality. Is it a sin or are we hardwired?
We don’t know for sure.
Christ is risen.
Of that we can be sure.

These are difficult issues for us, aren’t they? We each have our own sense of what the Bible says about them. We have trouble understanding how those on the other sides of the issues can possibly believe the way they do.

Don’t they know the truth?  No. They don’t. Neither do any of us until we finally stand before Jesus in the next life.

Jesus Christ is Gospel. He is good news. He is God come to earth to walk with us. We can’t add to the gospel or take away from it. Jesus Christ is Gospel and we see it in his work “for the life of the world” (John 6:51.)

Our doctrine is important to help form our faith. Our beliefs are important in helping us understand how to live out that faith. But neither of these are gospel.

We die with Jesus; we endure with Jesus, knowing that we also live with him and will be with him someday. Sometimes we lose faith; sometimes we quit believing. And that’s when we allow others to believe for us. That’s when Jesus carries us, because he isn’t about to let us go. Not ever.

Earlier in chapter two of Second Timothy, Paul reminds us about soldiers and athletes and farmers. He knows that there will always be opposition and struggle in the church. Our human tendencies can lead us astray to jealousy or rejection. When that happens, people suffer.

Paul reminds Timothy to stay focused on the mission. Be like a soldier who stays at his job without veering off course. Be the athlete who knows the rules of the game and has the discipline of hard work and training behind him. Be the farmer who works hard every day, knowing that the harvest will happen.

Remember. Remind. Be Diligent.

“Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved by him…” and “avoid profane chatter” (vv 15 & 16.)

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.




October 4, 2016, 12:22 PM

Faith in Discouraging Times

by Sandy Bach

I am grateful to God—whom I worship with a clear conscience, as my ancestors did—when I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day. Recalling your tears, I long to see you so that I may be filled with joy. I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that lived first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, lives in you. For this reason I remind you to rekindle the gift of God that is within you through the laying on of my hands; for God did not give us a spirit of cowardice, but rather a spirit of power and of love and of self-discipline.

Do not be ashamed, then, of the testimony about our Lord or of me his prisoner, but join with me in suffering for the gospel, relying on the power of God, who saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works but according to his own purpose and grace. This grace was given to us in Christ Jesus before the ages began... (2 Timothy 1:3-9 NRSV)

 

I remember the 1950’s, standing next to my father in worship as the congregation sang “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus.” There was hardly an empty seat in the sanctuary. We needed ushers to help people find a place to sit.  I remember walking to the church after school to meet my mother who had just finished a Bible study in the Pastor’s Study and was headed to the kitchen with the other women to give it a good cleaning.  My brother’s youth group met every Sunday evening. They planned a trip into the mountains to collect mistletoe to sell during Christmas in order to fund the church a new sign.  Sunday school classes were full to overflowing.

Then 1965 happened. It was the beginning of the end of an era. From that time forward the mainline church in America would show steady decreases in their membership rolls. To this day, we find the church “bumping the stairs.”

Some say the church in America is dying.

Denominational allegiance is all but gone. The Methodists or Presbyterian or Catholic DNA just doesn’t exist anymore. Lois and Eunice are sit in worship with their children and grandchildren. They sadly admit their families are involved elsewhere and wonder if they’re to blame.

Megachurches who have served the Boomer generation are having to reinvent themselves.

Meanwhile, Christianity has secured for itself a reputation of legalism, mean spiritedness and humiliating tactics against anyone or any group who dares to disagree with their particular brand of theology. And we all get painted with the same brush, despite our best efforts.

Some say the church in America is dying.

We could play the blame game. We could point fingers at this generation or that one. Perhaps the GI (or Greatest) Generation weren’t tolerant and flexible enough with the Boomers. The Boomers didn’t want to force their children to go to church; they wanted them to make up their own minds about God. Which led to a generation of very few people knowing God. Some would like to blame the Millennials for the lack of enthusiasm for keeping everything the same as it’s always been.

The letters to Timothy were written to a minister at difficult time. Christianity had become a threat to the Roman establishment. Judaism was familiar. Christianity was new and different and strange. They were called cannibals because they ate of the blood and body of Christ. They were considered atheists because they only worshiped one God instead of a pantheon of Roman gods. They were misrepresented and misunderstood at every corner.

The author is in prison. The church is struggling. Certainly the times were unsettling and discouraging. But what he writes is a letter filled with joy and encouragement.  He remembers with great joy and a few tears when he visited this congregation and ordained their young leader to the ministry. He can’t forget the faith that was passed on to him from his grandmother Lois and his mother Eunice.

Several years ago I heard the story of a family therapist who held a seminar on marriage enrichment. During the break a middle-aged man visited the seminar leader.

“I’ve fallen out of love with wife. What should I do?”

“Love her,” was his reply.

“But, I don’t love her anymore. That’s what I’m trying to tell you. So, what should I do?”

“Love her. Remember what you fell in love with and rekindle that love once again.”

The young minister will have to rekindle his love for and his faith in God. There are difficult and discouraging times in ministry.  This mentor knows this and gives the young man tools to use for those difficult times.

Don’t be ashamed he tells him. Join with me in testifying to God’s power that you learned at the feet of Lois and Eunice. Help your congregation see God’s grace alive in the church. You’ll suffer at the hands of the culture. Do it with courage and hold your head high. We’re doing this for the Good News of Christ our Savior.

We’re doing this for future generations.

We’re doing this for congregations thousands of miles and thousands of years from Ephesus, who will need this example of faith. They will need to know that God is at work and that God’s grace is all they need to take important steps into their future.

When I gaze out on our churches today, I see many people.
The matriarchs who stand tall, but with humility, keeping the church moving forward. The patriarchs who are leaders who now serve by mentoring the next generations.  Newer members who respect the old guard and step in beside them with their own unique gifts and talents. Younger members who have active careers and family responsibilities who make time to serve Christ’s church.
Young people, entering the job world. They’re learning to manage their time and their money. They’re creating new relationships in what to them is a new and exciting world of work and creating new families of their own. The children who are engaged in the life of the church.

I also see the hurts and disappointments. Lives broken by death or illness or disability. Families torn apart by mental illness. Dreams set aside to take on the life-long responsibility of caring for disabled loved ones in their home. Empty-nesters. Caregivers for parents.

When the cards seemed stacked against you, it’s easy to lose the vision. It’s easy to play the blame game. It’s easy to be diverted into activities that only increase our negativity and our shame.

Christ is head of the church. And I believe that God has been at work shaking the very foundations of Christ’s Church in order to build up something new and more faithful.

We’re a part of that. Every week I see examples of faith and rekindling. “God didn’t give us a spirit of cowardice, but rather a spirit of power and of love and of self-discipline.” (vs 7.) It is God who makes us strong and loving and wise. It is God who is at work, bringing us into a new reality.

As I look around each day, I see people of great faith, who are making a difference in the lives of others every day. I can’t see any lack for the abundance. I can’t play the blame game because of the steadiness of those in the faith.

When the disciples asked Jesus to "increase our faith," Jesus' response was simple.  Only have the faith the size of a mustard seed.  You don't need to worry about what you lack or feel guilt over what you've done or left undone.  You only need to look on Christ and know that the Holy Spirit is at work, turning that grain of mustard seed into something bigger and better than any of us could ever imagine.

Some say the church in America is dying.

Maybe it is.

But what I absolutely believe without a shadow of a doubt is that death leads to new life.  Transformed and transfigured.

And you and I are an important part of that.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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