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November 14, 2016, 12:00 AM

Church at Home

Focusing on the One to Come

by Sandy Bach

13 As he came out of the temple, one of his disciples said to him, “Look, Teacher, what large stones and what large buildings!” 2 Then Jesus asked him, “Do you see these great buildings? Not one stone will be left here upon another; all will be thrown down.” (Mark 13:1-2 NRSV)

 

Several years ago, my husband and I had an opportunity to tour England, Scotland and Wales.  The highlight of the trip was a tour of St. Michael's Cathedral in Coventry.  Their story is unique and inspiring.

Coventry was a industrial city: manufacturers of bicycles, automobiles, plane engines and munitions.  It was not unusual that it was a target of the Germans during WWII.  75 years ago on November 14, 1940 saw the worst of the bombing raids.  The Germans called it Operation Moonlight Sonata.  They first dropped marker flares.  Follow-up bombers dropped high explosive bombs directed at the city's infrastructure: water, electricity, telephones, gas and streets.  With bad roads and a low water supply, the fire brigades would be limited in their ability to put out fires.

Then the bombing began in earnest: waves and waves of a variety of bombs meant to hamper the city and damage roofs so that incendiary bombs could do their worst.  Around 8:00 that evening, Coventry Cathedral was hit for the first time.  They managed to put out the fire, but soon after a firestorm ensued and all attempts to save the structure utterly failed.

When the all clear sounded the followed morning, Coventry's citizens came out of shelter to find their city decimated.  Two-thirds of the city lay in ruins.  Some made their way to the Cathedral to discover that only one wall remained.  The balance of the cathedral lay in ruins.  During the following week a crew worked to clean out the ruins.  Some charred beams were found lying together in the shape of a cross.  The cathedral stonemason tied them together and mounted them on the ruins.

The Provost of the cathedral came across nails from the roof and formed three of them into a cross.  The Cross of Nails has become a symbol of peace and reconciliation in the world.  The most moving event took place in that same week, when the Provost had words written across the only wall to remain standing: "Father, Forgive."

When Jesus and his disciples left the temple in Jerusalem, they must have felt about the temple the way we feel when we enter the great cathedrals of Europe.  They are huge beyond our imagination.  They represent that God is bigger than all of us and we can feel God's power and presence.  The temple was described as a huge pile of marble with gold decoration.  These disciples from small villages would have felt that power and presence.  They must have felt something beyond amazement at the size and beauty of the structure.

All Jesus says is, "It's going to be a pile of rubble."

When the temple was utterly destroyed in 70 C.E., it must have been a shock.  Where was God?  What was going on?  Was this the end of the world?

When the Cathedral in Coventry was destroyed along with 2/3 of the city's buildings, perhaps the citizens felt much the same way.  The Cathedral that was more than 500 years old was a pile of rubble.  Where was God?  Was this the end of the world?

And, yet, out of that horrible night of terror and bombing, they were able to begin the process of forgiveness.

For the enemy who wants to destroy our way of life.

Father, forgive.

For humanity's role in death and destruction and war.

Father, forgive.

For our inability to live peacefully with our neighbors.

Father, forgive.

For greed and hubris and arrogance and evil.

Father, forgive.

Last night, most of us were glued to the newscasts of the terrorist attacks in Paris.  They were attacks of hate and evil and meant to hurt us at the deepest level.  This morning we watch as nations stand in solidarity with France as they try to begin the healing.

Further on in this scripture reading, Jesus warned the disciples about violence and suffering and natural disasters.  "This is but the beginning of the birth pangs."

Is the end near?  Or is our 21st century technology more adept at keeping us focused on disaster and war?  I only know that the birth pangs hurt and most days I pray, "Come, Lord Jesus."

I admire the people of Coventry who could say, "Father, forgive."  I admire their courage and their refusal to allow hate to grab hold of them.  Maybe they were able to look beyond the signs of what appeared to be end times and focus on the Christ who is to come.

It's all we can do, right now.  Focus on Christ at the center of all the chaos.  It's all we can do to know that God is God and that God is in charge.

And someday, maybe soon, we, too, can say, "Father, forgive."

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.

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