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March 12, 2017, 12:00 AM

Guard Your Ears

by Sandy Bach

12 Now the Lord said to Abram, “Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse; and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.”

So Abram went, as the Lord had told him; and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran.(Genesis 12:1-4 NRSV)

She’s hopelessly barren. The fact slips into their lives after years of trying to have a child. And now a long and prosperous family tree comes to a sudden and abrupt end.

One of the most difficult things for a woman to accept is her inability to bear children. I’ve counseled several and I personally know their pain and heartache. People don’t understand. Sometimes they’re mean, bragging about their ability to get pregnant and how rough their labor was.  Every baby you see is a stab in your heart. Baby showers are torture; you find excuses to avoid them.

On Mother’s Day you get patronized with statements like, “You’re a mother to all these children in our congregation.” Or “You’re a good woman; it’s not your fault you can’t carry a child.” And you wonder: do they really care or do they want to feel less guilty about their joy over motherhood?

Sarai tries to hold back her tears. Sometimes, it’s all she can do to keep from feeling jealous and angry. It hurts deep down and just when she thinks she has it under control, another reminder comes up and she returns to that tunnel of grief.

In her day, they don't know the science behind it.  Therefore, Sarai is a failure. It’s her fault. God has closed up her womb, probably as punishment for something she’s done.  Abram will have no sons to carry on his name. He’ll be forgotten without children to remember him and share his stories. His immortality is in his children.

In the Bible, barrenness means hopelessness.

God steps in to this heart-wrenching picture with a unique call to Abram and Sarai to move. Isn’t it enough that she won’t bear Abram a family of their own? Now they’re to leave their extended family, their home, even their country to journey to God only knows where.

They live in Haran, the “City of Crossroads.” And at the dead end of life, God offers them a laughable proposition: leave everything you value behind. Travel to a yet-to-be-revealed destination where God will bless them and make of them a great nation.

A what?

Did you say “great nation?”

Is this a joke? Are you trying to rub salt in the wound on purpose? That’s impossible. We’re barren, God. Remember?

But, God has a plan. It’s a long-range plan to build a nation starting with an elderly couple unable to have children. The future of Israel rests with God, who will build trust doing the impossible.

We could ask why did Abram go? Did he give it much thought? How much faith did he have in God?

We don’t have those answers. We could fill in those blanks with suppositions, but in truth, the text doesn’t care. What matters in this story is not what and who Abram and Sarai are, but what and who they will be.

In this season of Lent, we’re journeying to the cross in a series entitled, “Life’s Continuing Journey.” Last week we met up with Adam and Eve and rediscovered our inability to set temptation aside. We need a savior and we need him now.  Today and in the next few weeks we’ll see that God has a plan.

But, right now, Abram and Sarai need a savior. God has a plan. But, for us to see God and only God at work, God chooses the impossible in order to build trust with God’s people. After all, “nothing is impossible with God.”

Listen to God’s words:
I will make you a great nation
I will bless you so that you will be a blessing
I will bless those who bless you
I will curse those who curse you

This mission is all about God. God is leading this journey and God will provide what is needed.

What crossroads have you met in your life? What crossroads are you encountering today?

Abram and Sarai leave all that’s important to them behind. At a crossroads in their life, they choose new beginnings; new life with new promises.

I serve two blended congregations who are journeying to federation.  This text speaks to me about our journey to something new.  Two congregations are leaving the comfortable and the familiar to take a leap of faith to journey to new beginnings; new life with new promises.

When my husband and I set our wedding date, we selected Saturday, October 12: Columbus Day. I was teaching at the time, and one of my fellow teachers loved to tease me about it. “You’re getting married on Columbus Day? Really? What do we know about Columbus? He started out not knowing where he was going. He didn’t know how to get there. And when he arrived he didn’t know where he was! What kind of date is that for a wedding?”

Actually, it sounded like a pretty good date to me. Very few of our own plans worked out, but our life together hasn't been dull.

I wonder if that’s how you feel? Not knowing where you’re going. Not knowing how to get there. And wondering what you’ll look like when you arrive?

Perhaps we can learn from Abram and Sarai. They moved slowly, listening to the crunching sound of the wheels of the cart moving across a rocky desert floor; the dry, arid wind; new surroundings; new everything. Setting up camp, perhaps staying for a period of time before moving on.

The journey itself was as important as the destination. A time to grieve the loss of what they’d left behind; to come to terms with the so-called failures they’d experienced; to learn to trust God who was leading them to a new life; time to see their faith at work.

At the end of their lives I hope they could look back to see how God had been at work in their lives. They were a couple with very little to offer. She was barren. They were elderly. They learned that God didn’t need youth and vigor and fertility. God transcended that and did his best work with two people past their prime. God gave them new names: Abram, exalted ancestor, became Abraham, ancestor of a multitude.  Sarai, the one who was a mockery, became Sarah, princess.

Make no mistake about this: God would be the one to overcome; God would exercise God’s powers to make this plan a reality.

They left a lot behind: their identity as members of a family and community; their wealth; their security and protection. It was a costly demand, but they went anyway. God led and they flourished beyond their wildest dreams.

As you journey to the cross, what do you need to give up or take on?

What security and protection do you cling to, while God waits for you to reach out to Him?

What blessings are waiting for you?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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