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August 13, 2017, 12:00 AM

Lonely the Boat

by Sandy Bach

22 Immediately he made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. 23 And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, 24 but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land,[a] for the wind was against them. 25 And early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. 26 But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. 27 But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”28 Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” 29 He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. 30 But when he noticed the strong wind,[b] he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” 31 Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” 32 When they got into the boat, the wind ceased. 33 And those in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

Jesus is tired.  Physically and emotionally exhausted.  Spiritually depleted.  A trip home that should have been filled with joy ended in shambles as the townspeople utterly rejected him.  And then word arrived that his close friend, John the Baptizer was killed by Herod as a result of drunken party and young woman's erotic dance.

He went off for rest only to discover that crowds of people followed him.  5,000 plus women and children.  People energize Jesus.  And when he saw them, he couldn't not take care of them.  He healed.  He cured.  He fed.  He created community.  And as we stepped back from the scene, we caught a glimpse of God's kingdom: a place where everyone is accepted, agape love abounds and all are fed until they're full.

If Jesus was tired before this, he's thoroughly exhausted now.  He needs time to pray and grieve and rest.  It's time for the crowd to pack up and return home.  He and the disciples watch as they begin to gather their meager belongings.  Mothers gather their children.  Father's shake hands with new-found friends.  Jesus turns to the twelve.

"Get in the boat and head to the other side.  I'll join you later."

They try to argue with him.  Why don't you come with us?  A couple of us will stay with you.  How will you travel to join us?

"Just go.  I'll be okay."

He turns back to the crowd and provides a final blessing and benediction.  The crowd begins their journey while the twelve get in the boat.

Quiet settles slowly.  Peace and quiet.  Jesus can finally have that alone time he needs.  Slowly he walks the narrow path up the mountain where he can be closer to God.  The next several hours are spent in prayer, rest and sleep.  More prayer.  Perhaps some weeping.  So much evil in the world.  So much to do.  Not enough time to get it all done.

Prayer.  Rest. Sleep. Repeat.  God's shalom surrounds him.  Pray. Rest. Sleep.  The brokenness and hostility of the world drop away to be replaced with God's wholeness, completeness, fullness and balance.  Peace and shalom surrounds Jesus as he prays and rests and sleeps throughout the night.

Meanwhile, a storm is brewing.  Storms develop quickly on the Sea of Galilee.  The winds sweep down the mountains and toss the sea around like a bowl of water.  The fishermen on the boat call out orders to the novices.  (What do tax collectors and political zealots know about boats and angry seas?)

They hold on to the the ropes while wiping water from their eyes with their upper arms.  This storm is bad.  Can they survive it?  Fear has them in its grip.  Just when it couldn't get worse, it does.  A ghost appears, walking directly toward their wind-tossed boat.

Oh, great! a demon, perhaps?  We're surely doomed, now.

Then they hear his voice.  Calm, steady, piercing the sound of the wind.  "It's okay.  It's me.  Don't be afraid."

Peter drops his ropes and makes his way to that side of the boat.  "It's him!  He's walking toward us.  On the water!"

"Lord, order me to come out and join you.  Let me try it."

"Okay, Peter.  Come on out."  And he gestures with his arm.

Eagerly, but but not without a tiny bit of trepidation, Peter climbs over the side of the boat and lowers himself onto the water.  He did it.  He's standing on the water!  Now, he takes a step.  He gazes on Jesus and sees his encouraging smile.  Water sloshes around his toes as he takes steps toward the Master.

He'd forgotten all about the storm.  Suddenly, a gale slaps him across the face and he drops his attention from Jesus.  Fear and doubt settle in; he drops into the water like a rock.

"What was I thinking?  What a stupid thing to do.  I've let everyone down, especially Jesus.  Some disciple I am!

Just then he feels strong hands reach around him and lift him out of the water.  "You did good, Peter.  Why did you doubt?"

And then the peace.  That shalom that Jesus brings with him.  That wholeness; completeness; balance.  Peace settles the storm and the disciples fall to their knees.  Tired, worn; awe-filled and trembling.

Once again they realize what they've known all along.  "Truly, you are the Son of God."

It's a lovely narrative.  Lots of scenery and color and movement.  Peace and fear; miracle and failure; most of all, a happy ending.

What scares you?  Really scares you.  I'm talking about paralyzing fear that engulfs you like that storm on the Sea of Galilee.

How badly our churches want to enter into the mission field.  They want to reach out to help those who are holding on tight while poverty or illness engulfs them.  They want to make broken lives better; offer healing from abuse; reach out to the children so desperately in need of shalom.

But, we're paralyzed with fear.  We don't know where to begin.  We don't have enough people.  Money is at an all-time low.  Do we pay the electric bill or fund that new mission?

We try.  We step out and try and when we don't see the immediate return, we feel like failures.  We did something wrong.  God wasn't with us.  We're failures and the whole world has witnessed us making fools of ourselves.  We've let God down.

And we step back into the church and close the doors against the howling storms of a broken world.

Here's the good news:  it's not about us.

God calls us to be faithful, not successful.  That's God's job.

Several years ago I  met a minister from New England.  He pastored a church located in the worst part of the inner city.  He shared with me their ministry.

It was litany of one success after another.  They cleaned out the old basement and have a food pantry and offer classes to the neighborhood to help them get a job.  The members spent days going out into the neighborhood picking up trash (including spent needles and condoms.)  For several minutes my new friend waxed eloquently about everything his congregation was doing to meet needs.  He was excited and grateful.

The more he talked, the quieter I became.  Finally, I asked him a question.  "How long have you been doing this?  How long did it take to figure out your call?"

He paused for a thoughtful moment and studied my face.  I think he saw my fear and disappointment at my own meager attempts.  It turns out that he knew what I was feeling.  He'd been in my shoes.

"It took years," he finally replied.  "It took years to get to the point in our ministry where we could see the next opportunity.  Not everything worked and not everything works today.  In fact, we had several starts in the beginning."

We talked a bit longer.  About false starts and lack of clear vision and disappointment.  His parting words to me were, "Keep moving forward.  Step out in faith.  Remember that Jesus only had twelve disciples and one of them was the devil!"

Stepping out is hard.  We want to.  We so desperately want to.  We hear that call to offer healing and food.  But, we're held back by scarcity.  We need more money and time and people.  We forget that Jesus is in charge and will provide all that we need.

What we need is a miracle.  The miracle of Jesus' calm voice saying, "Little Believers, you won't let me down.  Your tiny mustard seed faith is all I need from you.  Whatever happens, I'll never ever be disappointed in you.

"Little Believers, that boat is filled with fear and scarcity.  Step out in prayer.  And keep stepping out.  Sometimes you'll sink like a rock; other times you'll soar with the eagles.

"Little Believers, step out.  Don't worry about what others are thinking.  That's what takes your eyes off of me.  Don't worry about pleasing some high expectations you think I have.  That's the rain slashing across your face.

"Little Believers.  Step out.  I've got you and I'll provide what's missing: energy, time, people, money."

Do we dare do it?  Do we dare to step out of that lonely, fear-washed boat?  Someone needs you to offer them Jesus' healing and shalom.

Are you the one he's calling?

If so, listen to him say,

"Come on Little Believer.  Let's get to work.  That's it.  Step out of that boat.

"Yes!  I knew you could do it!"

After all.  Is anything impossible with God?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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