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December 3, 2017, 12:00 AM

Mission:Impossible — Hope

by Sandy Bach

The beginning of the good news[a] of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.[b]

As it is written in the prophet Isaiah,[c]

“See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you,[d]
    who will prepare your way;
the voice of one crying out in the wilderness:
    ‘Prepare the way of the Lord,
    make his paths straight,’”

John the baptizer appeared[e] in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. And people from the whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem were going out to him, and were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. Now John was clothed with camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. He proclaimed, “The one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to stoop down and untie the thong of his sandals. I have baptized you with[f] water; but he will baptize you with[g] the Holy Spirit.”

Mark 1:1-8 (NRSV)

"Excuse me, Pastor.  But I think you printed the wrong scripture lesson.  You see, this is Christmas.  We want to hear about Bethlehem and angels and shepherds and Magi.  Why are you bringing John the Baptizer into this?  He isn't part of the Christmas story.  Is he?"

It'll be two more weeks before we read a "Christmas Story."  You see, this is Advent.  The four Sundays before Christmas Day when we do two things at once: prepare to meet the child in the manger and prepare to meet our Lord when he returns again.  That's a tall order for just four weeks.  So let's begin.

This is the Sunday of Hope.  And what better way to look at hope than to read about the Baptizer.  He's nothing like Jesus: dresses like the prophet Elijah, lives in the dessert, eats honey and locusts (yuck!)  Strangest of all, he doesn't announce himself.  He doesn't have a cover band to warm up the audience, he doesn't send out PR people to prepare for his arrival.  He simply arrives and does his job of pointing away from himself to the Messiah who will arrive soon.

He calls for repentance for the forgiveness of sins.  He preaches being right with God.

"Do we have to?  Really, Pastor.  Let's do this later.  How about the Season of Lent?  That's a good time to get all sad and do this  forgiveness stuff.  Right now, I'm pretty busy, you know.  Christmas gifts and parties and preparations.  Let's set John aside for Lent."

John will appear several times between now and Easter.  Today, we begin with John.  We begin our journey to the manger with repentance.  We remember that Christ will come again with repentance.

You see, these are two big moments in our Christian world.  Christ is born.  Christ will come again.  How can we NOT repent and turn, once again, to be right with God?

That's the hard part, isn't it?  Repenting.  It's like peeling away the layers of a smelly onion.  These layers are thick and they encompass our hearts, telling us that we can't live without, (fill in the blank): money, anger, war, hate... The popular TV commercial asks, "What's in your wallet?"  Today we might ask, "What's in your heart?"

Of what do we repent?  Repentance comes to us in many ways.  It is personal repentance when your confession is between you and God, alone.  There is also corporate confession when we confess together our sin and receive the assurance of pardon.  I have found repentance in watching the evening news.  I have found healing in stories that show humanity at its best.

But, seriously, is the world worth it?  It's god-forsaken.  It's unlovable.  And I'm unlovable.  We're all unlovable.  Talk about a smelly onion! It's impossible!

Impossible that God could be at work today in this godforsaken world; that God doesn't see the smelly onion and see anything of worth in our hearts; that God would be the least bit interested in inviting us to walk with God.  Impossible that we could hope for peace on earth; an end to hate and anger; a newness of life that leads us to righteous living.

Is anything impossible for God?  I mean, we're talking about God, here.  God, who intervenes in history and sends himself to live among us.  God, who frees us from our worry and hate and anger and all that gets between us and God.  God, who is at work today as diligently as ever, not noticing the smelly onion, but seeing the beauty of what God has created us to be.

We're free.  Free to open our lives to God, so that God can seep into the corners and crevices of our hearts and minds to show us how to live out the Mission of Christ in this godforsaken world.

Mission: Impossible -- Hope.

Yes, it's alive and well.  We live in that hope that we can be freed from it all because someone (God) knows all that stuff about us, and so much more.  We live in the hope that we can be freed from it all because God loves us: smelly and sinful though we may be.

All glory and honor be to God.


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