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March 11, 2018, 12:00 AM

Starting Over — Leaving the Wilderness


by Sandy Bach

You were dead through the trespasses and sins in which you once lived, following the course of this world, following the ruler of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work among those who are disobedient. All of us once lived among them in the passions of our flesh, following the desires of flesh and senses, and we were by nature children of wrath, like everyone else. But God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ[a]—by grace you have been saved— and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the ages to come he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God— not the result of works, so that no one may boast. 10 For we are what he has made us, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand to be our way of life.  (Ephesians 2:1-10 NRSV)

After the loss of a loved one, we usually enter a season of grief.  Depending on the relationship to the loved one, it can take a few weeks to more than a year.  There are too many variables to predict the length of time.  Eventually, the griever begins to reinvent their life without the loved one; not that they'll forget him or her, but they realize it's time to start over.

This can take many forms: cleaning out closets and reorganizing the home; moving to a new home or a new city; traveling more; staying home more; taking on a new hobby; even changing jobs.

Leaving the wilderness is similar to this.  We were there because we felt a spiritual longing that only God could heal.  We remain there until God says it's time.  And as we leave the wilderness, we don't return to the old way of life.  We enter what might look like the old life, but is really changed.  Perhaps our view on the old has changed and we see what must go.  Perhaps we see what's missing and we add it in.

It'll take time.  If we're intentional about our re-entry, we'll be aware of what goes and what stays.

Several years ago I traveled to Africa for ten days.  We visited a nation that is still one of the poorest in the world.  What I found was a lack of food and water mixed with an abundance of spirituality and desire to serve Christ.  When you have nothing, all you can rely on is God.  I returned home a changed person and spent time in my own wilderness.  I knew God was at work, so I waited.  When it was time, I heard God's voice.  I immediately volunteered for a layoff and took on jobs that were well beneath what I was used to earning.

I was happier than I'd been in years.  Coming out of the wilderness, I found joy in simple things (I couldn't afford to buy happiness) and welcomed each new day as if it were my last.

I left the wilderness only when God opened me to my new way of being. I had to rely on God for each step I took.  Should I get another job or take some time off?  What kind of work did I feel called to do?  Which of the skills I'd developed did I feel called to use?

Most of all, I had to know that God was in charge.  In the wilderness I had put myself in God's hands.  Healing had occurred in the wilderness.  More than that, transformation occurred.  The Hebrew slaves left Egypt and spent years in the wilderness.  When they finally entered the Land of Promise, they were not anything like the parents and grandparents that had left Egypt.  They had worked hard and slowly shed the slave mentality.  They had learned a new way to worship and put their skills to work, creating a Tabernacle for worship, the altar, the pieces that would become symbols of what their new found belief.  They were God's children.

And so it is with us.  We leave behind us what has held us back.  We enter with a new sense of who God is calling us to be.  But, we can't do it alone.  We only succeed with God's help.  God transforms our hearts and minds and then leads us where we can grow in our new person-hood.

It's a gift of grace.  Undeserved.  Not of our own doing.  God graciously heals our broken or hurting hearts.  Our response is to meet God and allow God to be in charge (meaning, that you drop the illusion that you were ever in charge in the first place!)  We respond when we open ourselves to new things and new practices and new ways.

Grace.  Undeserved.  Not of our own doing.  God chose us before we knew God.  Our job is to recognize our need for salvation.  Coming out of the wilderness means that we acknowledge and confess that need.

Will your life be better than before you entered the desert?  Yes.  It'll be a better life because you didn't make it happen without God.  It'll be a better life because you decided to walk with God.

God's message to us is, "Meet me in your transformed life.  Continue leaning on me as I help you reinvent your life."

Do you have something you do regularly that puts Christ at the center of your life?  If not, what will you do to keep reminding yourself that not only are you not in charge, but Christ is your savior in your newly transformed life?

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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