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September 10, 2017, 12:00 AM

Unfair! Restoration for All

by Sandy Bach

15-17 “If a fellow believer hurts you, go and tell him—work it out between the two of you. If he listens, you’ve made a friend. If he won’t listen, take one or two others along so that the presence of witnesses will keep things honest, and try again. If he still won’t listen, tell the church. If he won’t listen to the church, you’ll have to start over from scratch, confront him with the need for repentance, and offer again God’s forgiving love.

18-20 “Take this most seriously: A yes on earth is yes in heaven; a no on earth is no in heaven. What you say to one another is eternal. I mean this. When two of you get together on anything at all on earth and make a prayer of it, my Father in heaven goes into action. And when two or three of you are together because of me, you can be sure that I’ll be there.”  (Matthew 18:15-20 The Message Copyright © 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002 by Eugene H. Peterson )

Note:  This is part one of a three-part series entitled, "Unfair!"  We will look at some texts that may make us feel uncomfortable, even angry and want to say to God, "That's not fair!"

Church, whether outside the walls like this blog or within traditional church walls, is not a non-profit organization.  Church isn't a club that exists to do good stuff, though reaching out is a part of our mission.  We do not pay dues, we return to God a portion of all that God has provided.  If it were that simple it would be easier: we could "recruit" new members, have a theme song and send out dues notices.  We could "assign" tasks and elect officers to lead us.

Church is more than the sum of its parts.  Church is made up of broken people who know they are in need.  Church is worship of God who is far more awesome and far bigger than we can even imagine.  Church is reaching out to others in unique ways: giving of time, talents and money; being in relationship with those who are in need but can't find what they're looking for.

Church is fellowship: breaking bread together at the communion table and at the potluck dinners; praying for each other in sickness and tragedy and death and hurtful times; laughing and crying; trusting enough to be vulnerable with each other.  Church is a place we can go to catch a glimpse of God's kingdom.

So, it's no surprise that Jesus spends some time teaching us how to be church.  And here's the rub: sometimes we misbehave and we have to deal with it using kingdom values.  Jesus doesn't permit us to behave like the culture around us behaves.  No, we have to behave like disciples of the One who went to the cross.

That's sooo unfair!

For example.  Jesus tells us how to handle disagreements.  It's a step-by-step formula:

  1. Confront him or her privately.  Try to work out your differences and come to terms that are agreeable.
  2.  If that doesn't work, take one or two others to be witnesses and to keep things honest and fair.
  3. If that doesn't work, tell the church.
  4. If that doesn't work, treat her or him like a tax collector or a Gentile.

Step one may be difficult but it's definitely do-able.  Prayerfully, speaking in private can usually bring out the differences and reconciliation can be achieved.  It may feel awkward.  For some, it isn't easy.  I've had times in my life when I've chosen not to approach and it's turned worse instead of better.

Step two, gets a bit more difficult.  Finding two members of the congregation who can act impartially and prayerfully is critical to the success of this step.  Jesus specifically states that they are to act as witnesses, not body guards or henchmen.  No bullying allowed!  Talk it out and listen to your witnesses.

Step three.  Now it's getting harder.  Take it to the church.  Oh my.  I don't like to air dirty laundry in public.  Let's just drop it and I'll deal with it the best I can.  Nope, says Jesus. That's not allowed.  The church will need to provide a place of healing and reconciliation.  Everyone is vulnerable at this point and no one is allowed an "out."

Healing and reconciliation.  Hard words these days.  The news in my city has been difficult this week: murders, someone literally using their automobile to attack homeless victims.  Our societal nerves are worn so thin that our anger is a hair-trigger.  Social media is not just a place to share joys and concerns.  It's a place to display your anger and disgust in hate-filled ways.  We hate with ease; listen less and yell more; shut down when we don't like what we hear.

In the best of times, the church is the one place where healing happens because we listen prayerfully.  The congregation recognizes that Jesus is present and they know that everything they say and do is in his presence.

And after all that, if the offender refuses to repent, you can oust him or her.

Really?  Do you honestly believe that Jesus would permit that?  Scripture says we can treat him or her like a tax collector or a Gentile.  So, get those excommunication papers ready, and strip the offender of the keys to the church.  He's out of here!

Slow down.  Think about this.  Get your Bible out.

Who did Jesus associate with?  Tax collectors and Gentiles and sinners.  He enjoyed many a meal with them and offered relationship, healing and entry into fellowship.

Just prior to this text, we learn about a God who doesn't want to lose a single believer.  This God will leave 99 sheep behind to search for that  lone lost one.

Jesus also taught his disciples and followers that simple faith is the way into the kingdom.  No bullying allowed.

So, why did Jesus say, "Treat them like a tax collector and a Gentile"?  He said this to remind us that we have to start again from scratch.  We confront them with the need to repent and we offer God's forgiving love.

Unfair?  Perhaps.

But, there's more.

"What you bind on earth will be bound in heaven.  What you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven."  That doesn't mean that you have the power.  Nor does the church have the power.  Go to God in prayer with this.  Serious prayer and discernment and God will get to it.

Prayer is that place where we go to share with God what we think and feel, what gives us pain, what we question and don't understand.  Prayer is the place we go where God listens and God speaks.  God's got this.  God will work it out.

It seems unfair, doesn't it?

Being a member of Christ's church means that we have to work together and grow and strive with each other.  That striving means confronting, at times.  And when we do that we risk a lot and that's difficult.  We risk losing a friendship; we risk hurting someone.  But we also have an opportunity for growth and reconciliation that can't be achieved if we walk away and allow the hurt to simmer and grow.

Being a member of Christ's Church is serious business.  What we say or do is witnessed by Jesus.  He closes this passage with the reminder that wherever two or three are gathered, he's there with us.  So, if Jesus is present, what do you want him to witness: poor, unloving, hate-filled behavior?  Or an attempt at loving (even tough loving) filled with prayer and discernment?

It may seem unfair until we realize that we be the one in need of being reconciled.

It may feel unfair that you can't let a fellow believer loose and drop her from the rolls.  What if you're the one being set loose?

It may be unfair that we can't walk away from each other and forget.  We can walk away, but we can't forget.  We have to keep them in prayer just as we are held in prayer when we go astray.

When we honor this teaching from Jesus, we gain from it.  We are stronger, more faithful and less vulnerable.  We become a fellowship that builds bridges, tears down walls, and walks with each other in love.  Even tough love.

We become a place where no one is written off.  Not even you.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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