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March 5, 2017, 12:00 AM

Watch Your Step

by Sandy Bach

 The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it. 16 And the Lord God commanded the man, “You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; 17 but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.”

Now the serpent was more crafty than any other wild animal that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God say, ‘You shall not eat from any tree in the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden; but God said, ‘You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, nor shall you touch it, or you shall die.’” But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God,[a] knowing good and evil.” So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate. Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made loincloths for themselves. (Genesis 2:15-17; 3:1-7)

My mother had a knack for making the most amazing pies. Her apple pies were the best: flaky crust, fresh apples, cinnamon and sugar. I can taste it now.

Her cakes were okay, but nothing to write home about. Except for her browned coconut frosting. I believe it was brown sugar she mixed with the coconut and then placed under the broiler for a short time. I loved that frosting. I loved it way too much.

One Saturday morning, my parents and brother slept in while I played quietly in my bedroom. I was feeling a bit hungry, so I slipped into the kitchen to find something to eat. There it stood under the wax paper cover: that cake with the browned coconut frosting. I tried a bit of the frosting and then a bit more.

For the next hour, I moved between my bedroom and the kitchen gradually scraping the frosting off the cake. It was sublime! Eventually, though, I knew I would have to face up to my family about the cake that had lost its frosting. No matter, I would deal with that later.

Eventually my family awoke and we gathered at the kitchen table for breakfast. I thought perhaps I’d gotten away with it, until my father asked the question.

“Sandy, any idea what happened to the cake?”

“No.”

“It has no frosting on it. Do you have any idea how that happened?”

And that’s when I came up with the most remarkable, brilliant answer ever.

“Must be ants.”

It didn’t work.

Don’t you wonder, at times, what’s wrong with people? Why did I have to eat the frosting? Why did I have to eat all the frosting? Why did that driver get so angry? Why did Adam and Eve reach out to taste that fruit?

What’s wrong with people?

Did God ask too much? God put Adam in this dainty garden of delight and luxury. He was to till and keep it. That means he was to serve and keep and preserve the garden.

In return, God gave Adam free reign over all the trees in the garden, except the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Adam had freedom with boundaries and he had a job.

God provided animals and permitted Adam to name them. Then God created his helpmate, woman. And Adam was delighted. Together they would preserve and keep this beautiful garden.

But there it sat day after day. Beautiful to look at; a delight to the eye; the fruit good for food. It stood there in the center of the garden, majestic in its beauty. Wherever Adam and Eve went, there it was. Standing almost arrogantly, as if to say, “You can’t have me.”

Soon it became something to contend with. Why wouldn’t God permit them to eat of it? Enter the serpent, the craftiest of God’s created animals. He poses a question that he well knows the answer to.

“So, you can’t eat of the fruit of any of these trees, right?”

“No,” she responds. “We can eat of everything. Just not that big one in the middle of the garden. It’s off limits.”

“Oh?”

“Yes. We can’t eat of it, or touch it, for that matter. If we do, we’ll die.”

“No, you won’t. You won’t die. God knows better. In fact, if you do eat of it, your eyes will be opened. You’ll see life as you’ve never known it. You’ll know good and evil.”

That’s all it took. A nudge here, a wink there, a few well-phrased words and they’re justified.

We’ve been there. Rationalizing a bad decision; standing naked with shame from an act made in the heat of the moment; listening to those inner or exterior voices that help us rationalize and justify our actions.

Our job is to serve and protect this garden we call earth. But we can’t keep our eyes off that tree. We know we must care for God’s creation even as we sign into law actions that inevitably hurt ourselves and others and the planet. We trust God and God’s provision until we can’t. We yearn for security and turn on those who don’t look like us. And then we turn them into the cause of our insecurity.

We justify ourselves: we need these natural resources or we won’t survive. Those who suffer for those actions will just have to deal with it.

“Those people” are sending terrorists or drugs to our land. And that justifies our treating all of them inhumanely.

That serpent is crafty, indeed. God ahead and eat that fruit – it’s good for you. It’s the healthy and right thing to do. Even though God said not to touch it.

Jesus faced the ultimate in temptations in the wilderness. He was tempted by hunger. He was tempted to save himself from danger. He was tempted to take over all the power in the world. (Maryetta Anschutz “Feasting on the Word: Pastoral Perspective” Year A, Volume 2 (Louisville, Westminster John Knox Pres, 2010) page 46

Generation after generation fails just as Adam and Eve did. “[We] …fall hopelessly and irreversibly into the power and habits of sin." (Walter Brueggemann “An Introduction to the Old Testament” (Louisville, Westminster John Knox Press, 2003) Page 37)

And we stand naked and ashamed, trying to cover ourselves up.

We need a savior and we need him badly. Fortunately for us God has a plan and we’ll search out that plan during this Lenten Season.

God not only has a plan, God provides. The good news in this text comes beyond our reading for today. After God confronts them with their failure to listen; after the consequences are explained; before they heard the slam of the gate and saw the cherubim standing guard, God made them decent garments of skins; God covered their nakedness.

This couple who gave up everything in a moment of temptation will enter life as we know it today. Joy and tears; birth and death; hard work and pain; but always God’s provision.

We can’t help ourselves. Thanks be to God we don’t need to go it alone. In this journey to the cross, let’s learn about God’s activity in the world to bring ultimate salvation.

All glory and honor be to God.

Amen.


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